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#27937 - 08/20/03 03:35 PM Re: Teaching Praise & Worship
NancyK Offline
Mainstay Member

Registered: 03/27/03
Posts: 644
Loc: North Dakota
Yes..I chose familiar tunes for them such as Happy Birthday, Amazing Grace and Twinkle Twinkle Little Star. We were also going to do My Country Tis of Thee, but didn't get to it, so it will be next. Also, Alleluia and Father I Adore You. Some did those.

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#27938 - 08/20/03 03:39 PM Re: Teaching Praise & Worship
Lisa Kalmar Offline
Star Member

Registered: 04/10/00
Posts: 4277
Loc: KC
Check out Lead Lines and Chord Changes by Anne Collins, published by Alfred. I read about it somewhere, but don't have yet. Noona used to have a series called FOllow the Lead. I messed around with the first book and hated it, so I can't recommend it.

ALso, there is the John Schaum Pop Piano Course, volumes 1-4, circa 1946 or so, that Eric told me about, that might teach the types o' twirls and thangs you're looking for. It's out of print, but copies are probably lying in attics all across America. Carole managed to find Warner's only copy left when she checked last week. I found volume 4 listed on eBay, but didn't buy because it came with a bunch of expensive old stuff I didn't want. Anyone here have it? It's not the pop books that are out right now - it's a course to teach lead line, etc.

Alfred has a whole series of thangs that might teach how to teach it. I went to an awesome Alfed workshop today with Domenic Cicchetti. The two books that look the most useful are Jazz Keyboard Harmony and 30-Day Keyboard Workout. This last one has a daily plan for getting your chops up to play out-of-the-box music. Both these books are advanced and directed at the teacher.

Although the afore-mentioned isn't churchly music, the theory aspect is certainly apropos to the situation. For students, DOmenic recommended either the Beginning Rock Keyboard or Beginning Jass Keyboard series, also by Alfred. The rock one would probably fit in with the praise band stuff. He also said their Learn from the Legends series is excellent. I can tell you from personal experience that Bert Konowitz's series stinks - or at least about 20 kids of mine in Omaha hated it when I put them in it a few years ago. It was like Alfred Method Does Jazz - pretty gross. I don't know WHAT I was thinking!

Nancy, I loved that chapter on the Black Hole also. Since I am guilty as charged, \:o I've decided to start my own JP - Jazz Project. As luck would have it, we are having a tri-state MTNA conference here in October and Anne Collins is a keynote speaker. The theme for the weekend is jazz and improv! My plan is to devote 15 minutes a day to it and see what happens.

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#27939 - 08/20/03 04:37 PM Re: Teaching Praise & Worship
Jalapeņa Offline
Star Member

Registered: 02/20/03
Posts: 1143
Loc: New Mexico
Books are nice, but you really need to immerse yourself in the musical style by listening to it a lot. If you're going to play with a worship team at church, for instance, then you need to attend church & listen to the music, then join a worship team, jump right in there & do it. Sink or swim. If you know your theory & you're familiar with the style, you'll swim.

It's really the same with jazz, folk, latin, pop, rock & any other musical style you wish to play. You need to do a lot of listening to familiarize yourself with the style before you can ever expect to render an authentic performance of that style.

Teachers, are your students listening to a variety of musical styles? If a student comes to you & tells you s/he wishes to play jazz, do you ask her/him if s/he listens to jazz? Do you ask her/him how familiar s/he is with that musical style? It really is important to be intimately familiar with a musical style before attempting to perform it. I'm as serious as a heart attack on this issue. Listen, listen, listen to the musical styles you wish to perform. Make sure you have a good "feel" for the style.

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#27940 - 08/20/03 04:49 PM Re: Teaching Praise & Worship
Lisa Kalmar Offline
Star Member

Registered: 04/10/00
Posts: 4277
Loc: KC
And that's the beauty of those Alfred series - they come with either CD's or midi disks to practice along with. You can also take one speaker off so you're just practicing with drums and bass if you want to instead of the whole arrangement if you don't have MIDI. And several in his demo looped so you can keep doing it til you get it right.

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#27941 - 08/21/03 07:18 AM Re: Teaching Praise & Worship
pianoc Offline
Star Member

Registered: 08/14/03
Posts: 1088
Loc: Goshen, Indiana
I just discovered that I have a book from Kevin Olson - Keys to Success Book 1 - probably came through the New Release program.

Has anyone used this yet? It doesn't have anything to do with Praise & Worship - however for some students that can't seem to get past the note thing, it has songs listing finger number/scale tones and rhythms, Jam Session - with each of the pentascales.

I thought it might be helpful for some that can't do anything without music in front of them. Just curious to know if anyone has tried it - if it is helpful or just another book?

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#27942 - 08/21/03 12:33 PM Re: Teaching Praise & Worship
Arlene Steffen Offline
Star Member

Registered: 06/20/00
Posts: 2972
Loc: Fresno, CA USA
 Quote:
Originally posted by Jalapeņa:
Books are nice, but you really need to immerse yourself in the musical style by listening to it a lot.


To a point, yes. But if you are not an aural learner but a visual or kinesthetic one, playing from a book first is the first step. A teacher can help a student in their aural development, but I think you need to start from the student's strength.

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#27943 - 08/21/03 02:14 PM Re: Teaching Praise & Worship
Jalapeņa Offline
Star Member

Registered: 02/20/03
Posts: 1143
Loc: New Mexico
Yes, but if you aren't able to learn aurally, then how in the hay are you supposed to catch the style? You can only learn so much from books. That's the point I was trying to make.

Actually, when I was listening to all those recordings, I was also following along in the songbooks. Back in those days, Christian music publishers sold songbooks that had notated vocal scores & piano accompaniments that were almost exactly like the recordings. I could use the recordings to help me "catch" the rhythms, etc. that were notated in the songbooks. That's how I learned to play the styles of music that my piano teacher wasn't teaching me. The songbooks & recordings were especially helpful for jazz & Latin styles. Nowadays, music publishers still print songbooks, but the arrangements are simplified, making it difficult for students to learn the way I learned. It's kinda hard to use a book when, for example, the rhythms you see on the page don't match what you hear on the recording! :rolleyes: This is a pet peeve of mine, so don't get me started or I'll never shut up, but I really wish publishers would quit simplifying rhythms! If they feel the need to simplify chords or whatever to make the music easier for people to play, fine; but leave the rhythms alone. Let piano students see how the rhythms they hear are supposed to be notated! No wonder piano students are confused. Wouldn't you be, if what you saw on the page didn't match what you heard???

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#27944 - 08/21/03 07:37 PM Re: Teaching Praise & Worship
Elbe Offline
Resident Member

Registered: 07/16/03
Posts: 323
Loc: The Great Northwest
I'm going to be teaching this also as I just signed on a thirteen year old boy who seems gifted. Just tonight We went over my list of praise and worship lead sheets and checked off all of the songs he knew. I'm going to hunt for those with 4 chords or less and have him first play/learn the key scale then work on the chords. Then we'll embellish (2 - 4 notes) and notice that the embellishment works within the scale pattern. Then we'll work on rhythm. Then I'll take the sheet away and call out the chords etc. Then when that doesn't work I'll try something else. Years ago, I tried the above approach with an adult student who was slowly picking it up. After one month she came to her lesson and announced that at some point during her church service she had impulsively walked up to the piano and started playing and singing......oooweee! would I have loved to have been a fly on the wall! he he. Anyway, its the only way I know to do it. I think Jalapena is right, you just have to dive in. That's how I learned. I've played in quite a few worship groups and just from observation cannot discount the part that desire and commitment play in wanting to learn " how to do worship". So it may boil down to the personality of your student and whether they are going to be extra motivated to learn this. I also wanted to point out that not only do you need to teach reading charts you need to teach the student that there are times to make noise and times to be quiet and there are times to play funky rhythm and times to play slow arpeggiated leads.....to every thing turn, turn, turn......

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#27945 - 08/22/03 05:59 AM Re: Teaching Praise & Worship
Arlene Steffen Offline
Star Member

Registered: 06/20/00
Posts: 2972
Loc: Fresno, CA USA
 Quote:
Originally posted by Jalapeņa:
Yes, but if you aren't able to learn aurally, then how in the hay are you supposed to catch the style?


That's where the teaching comes in! Visual learners need to see it, even if it doesn't match exactly. And that is the road to helping the student develop aural skills. You cannot expect an visual learner to just listen to something enough times that they pick it up. They won't. That's why you start with the eye and move to the ear.

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#27946 - 08/22/03 06:46 AM Re: Teaching Praise & Worship
Susan Offline
Star Member

Registered: 01/03/01
Posts: 2168
Loc: Texas
Jalapeņa, I remember you said you have perfect pitch. That puts you miles ahead of the average person. I would love to hear you improvise. I bet it's beautiful.
I've never had any trouble teaching a student with perfect pitch how to play from a lead sheets. They just seem to be able to listen and do it. But the average student needs more structure and visual help. The new PA Adult book 2 offers a little help in learning to play lead sheets, but it doesn't go very far. I'm still interested in the original question, what is the best book available to teach this (that is not out of print!!).

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