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#27688 - 03/23/03 12:36 PM Rebuilding a proper hand position
GeeTee Offline
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Registered: 12/26/01
Posts: 391
Loc: Midwest
I have a 13 yr. old boy who has studied with me for a while. He is quite talented but rather stubborn about taking instruction. In other words, he's a bit of a "know it all" and not the most "teachable" kid. Altho his reading, rhythm, and interest in playing is very strong, he IS beginning to run into a few technique "walls" due to a faulty hand and finger position. He tends to play with a flat finger approach about 1/2 the time and a nice curved finger approach the other half. His wrists are pretty tight too. He often "slaps" at the keys (like a jazz pianist), yet can bring out warmth & beauty from the music too. His end knuckle joints often collapse on fingers 2,3,4, and his movement across the keys is not efficient (more movement than what is needed). He's finding he can't play some things fluently up to tempo due to his poor technique, yet doesn't seem to want to accept that this will be the case until he makes an effort to correct things.

Now, for years I've drilled, reminded, demo'd, stopped & insisted on proper postion of hands/fingers, etc. and he will adjust for me then & there, but I know he's not attending to these details at home. I tell him to use his scale, chords, and arpeggio practice to focus on this, but I'm told he just runs thru these once or so with no attention on actual technique.

He's playing in the Celebration Series bk. 4, but I'm noticing that as he encounters more rapid scale passages, ornaments, and other technically demanding spots, he cannot control these and maintain fluency. And I've told him over & over that until HE decides to choose to follow my teaching instruction/advice, these problems will continue to plague him and hold him back.

He is such a musical and talented kid. He always shines at recitals and contests. He just doesn't appreciate another's expertise in a field of study where he naturally shines (coaches have said the same thing about him: talented athlete, doesn't accept coaching). This is really going to hold him back I'm afraid.

What can I do to rebuild his hand/finger technique, break poor technique habits, etc.
during the lesson and hopefully ensure his attention to this at home?

Thanks. GT

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#27689 - 03/24/03 11:04 AM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
Piano lady Offline
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Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 361
13 yrs old? Start him on the Bach Inventions. If anything can straighten out his technique, Bach will do it. To play Bach well, you need good technique. Bad technique shows up there faster than in any other music.

I play with my wrists pretty much in the same position all the time and use very little wrist motion. I don't find wrist motion that necessary.

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#27690 - 03/25/03 04:18 AM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
Bontempo Offline
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Registered: 08/17/02
Posts: 353
Loc: Belgium/Portugal
I've encountered this same problem. It seems as if some talented students don't care about technique. Here in Belgium I've recently met a 19-y.o. who is a big lover of classic repertoire and a dedicated amateur, but his sloppy technique lets him down most of the time.
Maybe you can try some SPECIFIC exercises to correct hand position, made up by yourself or taken from a technique book. You'll probably have to be quite hard on this point, making sure he practices these exercises every single day, and demo'ing them clearly at the lesson (as you already do). Taking him off the juicy repertoire may be too harsh, but you'll probably need to balance technique with the rest. It's a question of choice, and you must know the student very well. You could risk losing him to another teacher.

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#27691 - 03/25/03 01:48 PM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
Jalapeņa Offline
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Registered: 02/20/03
Posts: 1143
Loc: New Mexico
Mary Gae George has some exercises that work fairly well to develop proper hand position. I suggest buying her seminar tapes. They're well worth the money. \:\) Still, exercises aren't effective if the student isn't motivated to do them. :rolleyes: IMO, if the student doesn't accept suggestions & put forth a reasonable effort to improve, I wouldn't worry about losing him/her to another teacher. ;\) \:D

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#27692 - 03/25/03 07:00 PM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
GeeTee Offline
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Registered: 12/26/01
Posts: 391
Loc: Midwest
Thanks for the responses so far. I'm not too worried about loosing this student to another teacher, but what I see happening is that his technique isn't going to keep up with his need and ability to play more complicated repertoire up to tempo. He can execute everything (scale figures, chords, arpeggios, etc.) at slower more moderate speeds, but precision, clarity, and fluency are often compromised when he's pushed closer to tempo, and certain spots just never "clean up" with his faulty hand/finger positionings. During lessons, he'll express his frustration when he gets "tripped up", but yet he hasn't seemed to make the connection between his weak technique and hindered performances.

Would it be adviseable to perhaps have some lessons focus solely on technique work?

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#27693 - 03/26/03 06:44 AM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
Jalapeņa Offline
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Registered: 02/20/03
Posts: 1143
Loc: New Mexico
You say this student doesn't seem to make the connection between poor technique & poor performance. Why is that? Have you tried the direct approach? When working with him on technique, have you come right out & told him that his poor technique is hindering his ability to perform? (If you've already done this, please forgive. I'm just trying to help you figure out what teaching strategies might work with this student).

Regarding spending several weeks focusing solely on technique: I think that you, the teacher, should be able to work with him on whatever weakness he has. If it takes several weeks of concentrated focus on technique to get him to work & improve his skills, then so be it. If he doesn't want to work to improve his technique, he may get mad & change teachers; but since you said you wouldn't mind if he changed teachers, I say go for it. If he gets mad & quits, all you lose is an uncooperative student.

[ 03-26-2003: Message edited by: Jalapeņa ]

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#27694 - 03/26/03 08:41 AM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
GeeTee Offline
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Registered: 12/26/01
Posts: 391
Loc: Midwest
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Jalapeņa:
[b]When working with him on technique, have you come right out & told him that his poor technique is hindering his ability to perform? [b]

Oh yes, all the time. In fact he came for his lesson yesterday and throughout all aspects of his playing I was continually attempting to help him correct things. For example: We began with some hand position prep warm-ups (touching each fingertip to the thumb like an OK sign repeatedly. Having him dangle his arms down beside him and helping him see the natural curve of his fingers. Having him "scratch" the keys like he was giving them a back scratch to activate the curve of each knuckle over the keys while keeping the wrist relaxed.). He did everything eagerly.

Then during his scale playing I draped a small scarf over each wrist to help him focus on keeping the wrists low and level and allow only lateral movement while maintaining the curve of each knuckle. I tell him not to allow any fingernails to "show" (to avoid collapsed knuckles). This he did fine. Like I said originally, he'll do it all for me at the lesson with no problem, but at home these things are ignored.

When he began playing his pieces, I would often gently touch his shoulders to remind him to relax them, intermittently remind him to lower his wrists, curve fingers, keep knuckles high, etc., which he'd correct for a time, but return to the faulty positions soon after. We'd stop and work on specific spots in the music from a technique standpoint repeatedly. I wrote little technique reminders both on the score and on the assignment sheet. At the end of the time, I again told him that until he chooses to correct these problems in his technique, his playing will suffer...and I strongly reminded him that I expect him to focus on these things at every practice session.

That's where the stubbornness comes in. He wants to just get to playing the music, not the concentrating on these other issues.

[b] If he doesn't want to work to improve his technique, he may get mad & change teachers; but since you said you wouldn't mind if he changed teachers, I say go for it. If he gets mad & quits, all you lose is an uncooperative student.[b]

What I meant was that I don't forsee him wanting to change teachers. He's not uncooperative during lessons at all, just in his engaging his attentions on these areas at home. He's a great kid and we work together well. I just don't think he's experienced what I've been cautioning him about yet (cause he's so darn talented) and will only adjust his focus when indeed his playing does begin to suffer more apparently. He's like a toddler who has to touch the hot stove and experience the pain his mother warned him about before he believes her.

But as for things to do during the lessons, are there other things I could try?

[ 03-26-2003: Message edited by: GeeTee ]

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#27695 - 03/26/03 08:52 AM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
GeeTee Offline
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Registered: 12/26/01
Posts: 391
Loc: Midwest
Sorry I didn't get the bold quotes right. \:\(

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#27696 - 03/26/03 11:17 AM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
Jalapeņa Offline
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Registered: 02/20/03
Posts: 1143
Loc: New Mexico
I had a student like that. I gave the parents a handout about pianists' injuries that can result from poor technique (wrists below keyboard level, etc.). It didn't do any good; the student still kept playing with her fingers completely flat & her wrists extremely low... but at least they know that if the student doesn't work to develop good technique, she's headed for carpal tunnel syndrome & other problems. At one point I actually told the student's mother, "If _______ could play like that, I wouldn't worry about it so much. But she can't play like that. Her poor technique is keeping her from playing at proper tempo, etc." Also, when she performed for last year's LMTA Hymn Festival, she received a superior rating, but with comments from the judge about her poor hand position. I gave the mother a copy of that critique, so she knows I'm not the only piano teacher who pays attention to technique.

The bottom line is that you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink. Sounds like your student is going to have to learn the hard way. There's only so much you can do. The rest is up to him.

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#27697 - 03/27/03 11:38 AM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
Piano lady Offline
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Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 361
I was serious about the Bach.

Technique is an interesting subject. Here's some things I've noticed in my own playing.

Strengthening the "weak" fingers. There is something physical therapists use called Power Putty. Get the light blue consistency. It is the softest. Your student can play with this while watching TV. It is soft enough to relax the tendons and yet strengthen the knuckles.

Scales: slow to moderate speed (up to 1/4 = 144) -- wrist flat. Fast (over 144) wrist tends to raise. Extremely fast (over 1/2 = 92) high wrist and slightly angled hand facing in the direction of the scale. Very useful in Scarlatti pieces. Also the issue may not necessarily be in the hand it may be in the shoulder and chest. Make sure the shoulder and pectoral muscles are relaxed here as well as the fingers. Some students tend to tense in the chest as well during difficult passages. This will mess up the hand position. BTW does he remember to breathe when he's playing? Or is he a breath holder?

Arps: Legato arps are pretty irrelevant in practice since you're usually pedalling them. I use a forearm rotation on these and can get them very fast and even.

Chords: I use an inward forearm rotation. Control here is essential so you don't slam the thumb.

Scratching at the keys: This is a touchy subject with me since this can cause digging into the keys which can cause tendonitis.

I go back to Bach again. Bach's music will not tolerate weak fingers or weak end knuckles. His music also teaches economy of movement and the ultimate in control. If we look at a harpsichord the downstroke of the note is made with very little motion, just a twitch of the finger. You simply cannot waste motion. Likewise when playing his music on the piano.

If your student plays Bach well, he should be able to play just about anything you can throw at him. Suggestion about edition: Barenreiter and you finger the piece for him, or have him do his own fingering. The guy who did the fingering in Henle needs to have his head examined. :p

Doing your own fingering can be an interesting exercise in itself. You come up with one at slow tempo, and then you'll notice it may change as you bring the piece up to tempo.

The thing about this approach is that you can "trick" him into thinking he's just learning a new piece, yet he's working technique at the same time. I tend to stay away from dedicated technical exercises for the simple reason that it takes just as long to learn to play them well as it does to learn a first rate piece of music.

Oh well, back to that French Overture. ;\)

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#27698 - 03/27/03 12:22 PM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
Jalapeņa Offline
Star Member

Registered: 02/20/03
Posts: 1143
Loc: New Mexico
Mary Gae George has some great exercises to do away from the piano. They are specifically for developing the hand position, & they're nice to do before each practice session. Any willing student, of any age, can do them.

Yes, Bach is great... for more advanced students that like Bach. If the student doesn't like Bach, then it won't help to assign Bach 'cuz he won't practice.

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#27699 - 03/27/03 09:17 PM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
Piano lady Offline
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Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 361
 Quote:
Originally posted by Jalapeņa:


Yes, Bach is great... for more advanced students that like Bach. If the student doesn't like Bach, then it won't help to assign Bach 'cuz he won't practice.


Forgot. Wrong era. I didn't have a choice. "We do Bach to teach you counterpoint and coordination." Then I found when I got out of college that I liked him.

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#27700 - 03/28/03 06:01 AM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
Jalapeņa Offline
Star Member

Registered: 02/20/03
Posts: 1143
Loc: New Mexico
 Quote:
Originally posted by Piano lady:
Forgot. Wrong era. I didn't have a choice. "We do Bach to teach you counterpoint and coordination." Then I found when I got out of college that I liked him.


I sometimes forget I'm teaching in a different era, too, Piano Lady. These days, practicing seems to be a foreign concept to most students. I'm not even sure I'm going to keep teaching after I leave Lubbock. I've just about had my fill of working with students who won't complete their assignments. Students from my generation didn't pick & choose what they were going to do or not do. I don't know how things evolved to the present state where students call the shots, but it certainly makes teaching difficult. How can one learn if one is not willing to do the assignments? If the only time a piano student thinks about piano is once a week at lesson time, progress is painfully slow! :rolleyes: Getting students to equate practice with progress is, in a word, difficult. \:\(

Back to Bach: I agree that there's nothing better to get one's fingers in shape than Bach.

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#27701 - 03/28/03 01:40 PM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
Piano lady Offline
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Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 361
 Quote:
Originally posted by Jalapeņa:
I sometimes forget I'm teaching in a different era, too, Piano Lady. These days, practicing seems to be a foreign concept to most students. I'm not even sure I'm going to keep teaching after I leave Lubbock. I've just about had my fill of working with students who won't complete their assignments....

Back to Bach: I agree that there's nothing better to get one's fingers in shape than Bach.


We sound like old fuddy duddies. \:D I can understand the teaching frustration. We've had so few students and the ones we've had didn't want to do any of the work. Me? I'm starting to do chamber music. Now it's finding string players who can keep up with me.

There are too many teachers here for those who are willing. At the winter recital, so many students gave below expectation performances. I'll forgive the memory slips, but I can't forgive the sloppy playing. There were two teacher's students that were prepared. I can always pick out their students and have told them that.

Anyway, I've got to go back and work on my piano part.

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#27702 - 04/03/03 10:06 AM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
JK Wong Offline
Regular Member

Registered: 10/10/00
Posts: 91
Loc: Seattle, WA, USA
I know your struggle as most of us have students that play with what I call it "collapsing fingers". I often tell my students that they would have to play with the tip of their fingers. From the stand point of dynamic, it is more efficient to use the tip of the finger to play. Ask students if they can imagine energy is many little white dots. If they play with the tip of their finger tip all the little dots will be concentrated in the tip of their finger - hence they will have more power. If they play with flat finger, all the little dots will be completely spread out and they won't get all the power that they need. Most of my students seemed to understand that.

This other technique it seemed to work very well, especially with boys. I told all my boys that they should not be seeing their nails from where are their sitting. When they start getting flat fingers (that's when you can see your nail from where you are playing), I simply say "you got pretty nail!" You don't know how much that bothered them (it is a macho thing I guess. I might have to remind them several lessons and after that most of the problems are solved.

Hope that help!

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#27703 - 04/17/03 09:02 AM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
CR Offline
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Registered: 03/18/01
Posts: 289
Loc: Idaho
just wanted to comment on how these suggestions are great, and the student GeeTee has sounds almost exactly like one of my own. I'm definitely going to work these ideas into my teaching with that student and the others.
_________________________
It goes without saying that technical proficiency should be the first acquisition of a student who would be a fine pianist.
~S.Rachmaninoff~

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#27704 - 04/17/03 12:13 PM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
Jalapeņa Offline
Star Member

Registered: 02/20/03
Posts: 1143
Loc: New Mexico
Good luck. \:\) Some students are as hard as nails to train!

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#27705 - 04/17/03 12:24 PM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
CR Offline
Resident Member

Registered: 03/18/01
Posts: 289
Loc: Idaho
 Quote:
Originally posted by Jalapeņa:
Good luck. \:\) Some students are as hard as nails to train!


So I've learned... :rolleyes: But once the light clicks on, the rewards are awesome! \:\)
_________________________
It goes without saying that technical proficiency should be the first acquisition of a student who would be a fine pianist.
~S.Rachmaninoff~

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#27706 - 04/17/03 01:19 PM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
Jalapeņa Offline
Star Member

Registered: 02/20/03
Posts: 1143
Loc: New Mexico
The hard part is waiting for a light (any light) to click on. :rolleyes: Some students' brains just don't seem to be wired right... I wonder if some brains are even wired, if you know what I mean. You'll have to excuse me, but I just terminated the lessons of a non-intuitive adult student who (after almost a year of lessons) just couldn't retain any information. Sad. \:\(

 Quote:
Originally posted by CR:
So I've learned... :rolleyes: But once the light clicks on, the rewards are awesome! \:\)


[ 04-17-2003: Message edited by: Jalapeņa ]

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#27707 - 04/18/03 05:38 AM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
Bontempo Offline
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Registered: 08/17/02
Posts: 353
Loc: Belgium/Portugal
I guess the thing is to keep waiting for that light, without getting too anxious. Whenever I notice "the click" happening to a non-developing student I wonder if I was wrong in all the lessons I struggled through to keep my patience instead of accepting the non-development as a part of a phase and working for that "click". Before it happens, you'd never say it would. After it happens, you make the mistake of getting too anxious for other "clicks" in other students....

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#27708 - 04/18/03 08:19 AM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
Jalapeņa Offline
Star Member

Registered: 02/20/03
Posts: 1143
Loc: New Mexico
It's hard to teach kids with seemingly fried brains. I don't know if it's because they really have learning disabilities or if it's because they're tired from being overscheduled or what... but I can tell you there's a big difference between my own children & my students in Costa Rica compared with the students here in Lubbock. I think it has to do with culture & schooling, primarily in the home. There's just no other way for me to explain why I never had to deal with such learning challenges before teaching in Lubbock. Surely it's not the water! ;\)

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#27709 - 04/19/03 08:16 AM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
CR Offline
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Registered: 03/18/01
Posts: 289
Loc: Idaho
Bontempo and Jalapena,

you both have good points, and I can understand where you're coming from and all, since like I said, I have students who struggle and I along with them. But also speaking from experience, one my students that I had had for over a year and whom I was just about to terminate lessons with because no progress was being made, came to lesson one day and amazed me at how well she did. Seeing that faint spark of understanding at last, I didn't have to consider letting her go since I knew she had reached a point where she "gets it". It was a long and tedious trial, but so worth it. She's enjoying piano lessons more, and I am, too. \:\)
_________________________
It goes without saying that technical proficiency should be the first acquisition of a student who would be a fine pianist.
~S.Rachmaninoff~

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#27710 - 04/20/03 12:23 PM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
Bontempo Offline
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Registered: 08/17/02
Posts: 353
Loc: Belgium/Portugal
CR,

The experience you describe is just the "click" thing I was talking about. It DOES happen sometimes. It never ceases to amaze me when it does.

What I wonder is how far goes the teacher's contribution to that "click". Taking the case you mention as an example, were you always the "same" teacher for that student during the time when no progress was being done? Did you constantly try different approaches and finally got one she could grasp? Was it a problem of not working enough at home? Did you get any signs of an iminent change in attitude? Was it related to age? I think it would be instructive to discuss further this type of change. Music maker (where is she? \:\( ) mentioned that sometimes a personal change in the teacher can make all the difference.

---------------------------------------------

Jala, I personally deal all the time with this "fried brains" class of student. But that's not my main problem. My everyday struggle is to get them to work at home. I am positive that, if every student does his/her share of work at home, progress will happen. The majority of my good students in Portugal were students that worked at home and vice-versa. I always took some pleasure from teaching them.
I get the feeling that I'd rather have a medium-talented kid that practices 30 minutes per day than a potentially brilliant one that doesn't work. The latter is an exciting challenge, no doubt, but the former is much more gratifying. \:\)

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#27711 - 04/20/03 02:15 PM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
CR Offline
Resident Member

Registered: 03/18/01
Posts: 289
Loc: Idaho
 Quote:
Originally posted by Bontempo:
CR,

The experience you describe is just the "click" thing I was talking about. It DOES happen sometimes. It never ceases to amaze me when it does.

What I wonder is how far goes the teacher's contribution to that "click". Taking the case you mention as an example, were you always the "same" teacher for that student during the time when no progress was being done? Did you constantly try different approaches and finally got one she could grasp? Was it a problem of not working enough at home? Did you get any signs of an iminent change in attitude? Was it related to age? I think it would be instructive to discuss further this type of change. Music maker (where is she? \:\( ) mentioned that sometimes a personal change in the teacher can make all the difference.


Bontempo,

Thinking back, I didn't really change during that time of trying to bring her through the stage; I did continually try different approaches (thanks to the exceptionally helpful advice given on these very boards), hoping that one day she'd finally see the light. I don't recall any avail to them, though. Like I said, I was about to have a talk with her parent regarding the no-improvement matter when she came to her next lesson and just did great.

Perhaps she was told to practice more at home or something. Her attitude did change for the better, I observed. It might have been her age then - she was a 4th grader then; now in 6th grade. Although 6th graders do get moody, she's held her own pretty well I must say. She's mature for her age. Once the summer was over and the new school year began, she seemed to have had a really good music program at school because she'd come to lesson every week wanting to tell me what she'd learned at music class. I believe that placed a part in bringing about a maturness towards music, too.

I don't really see her change as something I necessarily played a big part in. I believe she just finally one day woke up and saw music is fun (when I first started her as a transfer student, her attitude was "I'm only doing this because mom/grandma wants me to". Now it's more "piano lessons are fun and not boring like it may seem. look at how much I'm learning!") Each teacher has something new to offer, and the teacher does make a difference in how the student responds to things. So having to continually drill and nag the student in being aware of everything and helping them to come to the understanding point does seem like an endless blackhole and no sign of hope anywhere, but even if you see the faintest glimmer of them coming to grasp a concept, I won't give up. My student whom I've used as an example did have the potential, but I wasn't looking hard enough. She's shown me without even knowing so that if I could get through at last to one student, then I surely can get through the other that seem *hopeless*. Patience is a definite must - for any kind of teacher. Just takes time (and patience :)). And what better time than now?
_________________________
It goes without saying that technical proficiency should be the first acquisition of a student who would be a fine pianist.
~S.Rachmaninoff~

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#27712 - 04/21/03 09:16 AM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
Jalapeņa Offline
Star Member

Registered: 02/20/03
Posts: 1143
Loc: New Mexico
The student I let go had other problems, not just problems with piano. She couldn't do very simple addition, she used a digital watch to tell time, & she couldn't remember her work schedule (she works as a "salad person" in a restaurant where her father is the chef; I guess he makes sure she gets to work on time, etc.), & her mother described her as a "slow learner" (understatement of the decade, IMO). In music, she couldn't identify intervals, or tell if one note was higher or lower than the previous note, or even tell the difference between the top & the bottom of the page. I tried many different approaches, but nothing worked. In her case, I don't think it was because she wasn't trying. She seemed to enjoy lessons, & had a great personality. I didn't have any problems with her in that regard. Nice girl who, unfortunately, has some major LD that her mother will not tell me about (I won't get into the difficulties I had in dealing with the mother; I already covered that in another post). Suffice it to say, maybe if I knew what her LD is, I could help her; but knowing what I know about her, & after working with her for almost a year & not seeing any signs of progress, I've gone as far as I can go with her.

None of my other students had LDs. They just didn't use the brains that God gave them, either because they were lazy or because during lesson time they were tired from being overscheduled.

I didn't have problem students or parents in Costa Rica. Well, I take that back. I did have 1. Only 1 problem parent in all those years of teaching, with 20+ students per week. Not a bad track record, compared to all the problems I've had here in Lubbock. I can deal with problems when most of my clients are good. However, IMO all the joy goes out of teaching when 99% of the people you work with give problems.

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#27713 - 04/22/03 12:12 PM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
Piano lady Offline
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Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 361
I know there are students who just can't get it. Yet I will speak from personal experience here. When I was 26 and getting back to playing after a six year layoff, the teacher I had at the time had great credentials. I felt, and he felt that I just didn't have it. My confidence was at an all time low. I just wasn't getting it, even though I KNEW I could get it, because I had GOTTEN it before.

Then at one lesson, I thought he was going to terminate me, and he was leaving teaching to go into the ministry. Fine I had to find another teacher, and he got me an audition with one of his old teachers. With this teacher I got it when I walked in the door the first time. The chemistry was there. I think sometimes whether or not a student learns depends upon the chemistry with between the student and the teacher.

That other teacher? I don't even remember his name.

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#27714 - 04/22/03 01:41 PM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
Jalapeņa Offline
Star Member

Registered: 02/20/03
Posts: 1143
Loc: New Mexico
It doesn't really matter much anymore. I'll not be teaching for a long while. I'm taking a long-overdue & much-deserved break. During that break, I'll continue practicing & studying for self improvement, & I'll continue teaching my own children. \:\) After a while, if I find that I miss working with problem parents & with students who are either completely clueless or as lazy as they come, :rolleyes: I'll go back to teaching. I have this feeling, however, that I'll miss it every chance I get. ;\) Time for me to go back to being a Domestic Goddess. \:D

[ 04-22-2003: Message edited by: Jalapeņa ]

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#27715 - 04/26/03 10:07 AM Re: Rebuilding a proper hand position
Bontempo Offline
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Registered: 08/17/02
Posts: 353
Loc: Belgium/Portugal
 Quote:
Originally posted by Jalapeņa:
It doesn't really matter much anymore. I'll not be teaching for a long while. I'm taking a long-overdue & much-deserved break. During that break, I'll continue practicing & studying for self improvement, & I'll continue teaching my own children. \:\) After a while, if I find that I miss working with problem parents & with students who are either completely clueless or as lazy as they come, :rolleyes: I'll go back to teaching. I have this feeling, however, that I'll miss it every chance I get. ;\) Time for me to go back to being a Domestic Goddess. \:D

[ 04-22-2003: Message edited by: Jalapeņa ]



\:\( But be sure to continue connected to PT.com.

Don't know why, but I get the feeling that you're teaching in the wrong continent... ;\)

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