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#26516 - 07/18/02 09:07 AM Re: Music Makers: At The Keyboard
John Offline
Star Member

Registered: 03/29/01
Posts: 2454
Loc: Bellingham, WA
Jala - Definitely purchase all 3 (SING & PLAY, WRITE & LISTEN, AND the TEACHER'S MANUAL). I think using S&P and loaning out ;\) MFLM's Discovery CD is a nice combo.

Bethann (and all), more workshop stuff:

Here were some of the books recommended at the workshop for anyone teaching music to young children:

SMART MOVES, WHY LEARNING IS NOT ALL IN YOUR HEAD (Carla Hannaford)

ENDANGERED MINDS (Jane Healy)

YOUR CHILD'S GROWING MIND: A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO BRAIN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING FROM BIRTH TO ADOLESCENCE (Jane Healy)

WHEN LISTENING COMES ALIVE (Paul Madaule)

THE CONSCIOUS EAR (Alfred Tomatis)

As someone who has (tried to) dance about 2x in my lifetime, I was most excited about the dances we learned. I kept reflecting on how much we as a society have lost these last 50-100 years by experiencing less and less dancing and singing as children. Here I think many teachers can help educate parents (and send a message) by either requiring movement and music classes before accepting private students for piano study or creating "piano preparatory" classes for all new students. What we’ve been doing for piano students is tantamount to placing a child who has not had Basic Math in an Algebra class and trying to “catch up” and cram before the many PREREQUISITE SKILLS are mastered. I don’t remember the exact quote, but someone remarked how “Theory can only tell us what the body already knows” (or something like that).

Of course we’ve also ignored the non-musical benefits of dancing like cooperation and a sense of community, as well as the links between the ear, movement, and balance.

(excerpt from a quick GOOGLE search below)

Sensory integration is the process of taking in information about the world around us with all our senses and from inside our own bodies. Through integrating and organizing the senses of vision, auditory, touch, movement, muscle awareness, and smell, we are able to interact comfortably and efficiently in work, play, and through social interaction.

As we move, touch, are touched, and place pressure on our joints and limbs, the brain is informed about the body's position in space and where our various parts are in relation to one another.
http://www.rmlearning.com/SensoryIntegration.htm

Concerning the music itself, this is probably the NUMBER ONE reason why I am using this program now (as well as the music from Hal Leonard and Faber) ~ I SIMPLY ENJOY IT! This is the first collection of music that I find myself singing and “audiating” ALL OF THE TIME. Of course the songs on the CDs have a much greater impact since they all contain children singing the words AND a wonderful variety of acoustic ensembles.….an advantage that instrumental music does not have! The words and tune just “stick” more. But I am also sure that the selection itself has to do with the appeal of the music -- these songs have existed for decades and centuries, and have been loved by children all over the world.

When working with the children, Karen had a wonderful way of stepping out of the way and guiding more than leading, observing and just being AWARE of every child in the class (esp. non-verbal cues), and having just the right mix of structure, spontaneity, and flexibility. Here (as always) you really have to observe a master teacher in action to fully appreciate what I’m trying to describe.

The pattern work fundamental to the whole program; rhythmic and melodic patterns are experienced sequentially and so ingrained that by the time a child SEES the patterns in music there is no question as to it’s sound of feel in the hand.

Workshops are mainly held in the summer, but if you go to you local teacher groups and get 10 interested, committed teachers, Musikgarten may be able to help you organize a local workshop.

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#26517 - 07/18/02 10:28 AM Re: Music Makers: At The Keyboard
Jalapeño Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/04/00
Posts: 5712
Thanks, John Dude. I just ordered the S&P teachers manual, along with the S&P Bk. 1 and the W&L Bk. 1. I'm not sure about loaning out the MFLM Discovery CD. Little Pepper is 4.5 now, & I can start using it with her. Also, this mother already told me she's willing to purchase CDs (& she also has a 16-month-old daughter). Her attitude is that music ed. is not going to be an option for her kids, so she sounds like she'll be a committed parent. You never know until you actually enroll the student, though. Some people say they'll do thus & so, but never follow through. :rolleyes:

[ July 18, 2002: Message edited by: Jalapeño ]

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#26518 - 07/18/02 04:06 PM Re: Music Makers: At The Keyboard
bethann Offline
Resident Member

Registered: 10/12/00
Posts: 359
Loc: Nebraska
Jala,

I think you are right on track with wanting to "custom" a method to your young student. We've all shared our thoughts on MFLM and Piano Party. I'll be curious to hear what you think of Sing and Play. Keep us posted!

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#26519 - 07/18/02 05:19 PM Re: Music Makers: At The Keyboard
John Offline
Star Member

Registered: 03/29/01
Posts: 2454
Loc: Bellingham, WA
Jala, Alfred may hate this idea, but I'd even go with JUST buying the CD set (there are 2) for MFLM and teaching the songs on the LESSON CD to the child first on a neutral syllable (like "bah") and later with solfege. I'd START with the White key pieces (all DO-RE-MI or LA-TI-DO), and introduce the black key pieces later (with DO-RE-MI-SOl-LA).

There are lots of neat activities on the DISCOVERY CD that you can do that aren't suggested, like playing a TONIC and DOMINANT single note (LOW) for the Mexican Song or playing along with the DO-RE-MI Tapping Song.

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#26520 - 07/18/02 05:29 PM Re: Music Makers: At The Keyboard
Jalapeño Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/04/00
Posts: 5712
I have the set. As a matter of fact, Little Pepper is listening to the Discovery Book 1 CD right now. \:\)

My new student's mother will love the solfege thang once I explain to her that that's the way they learn to read notes in Latin America. She's heavily into bilingual education. She speaks English & French, & wants her children to learn Spanish. She's asked me to include Spanish in the piano curriculum. Solfege is a great way to start.

[ July 18, 2002: Message edited by: Jalapeño ]

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#26521 - 07/19/02 03:07 PM Re: Music Makers: At The Keyboard
arsnova02 Offline
Mainstay Member

Registered: 07/29/01
Posts: 908
Loc: St. Louis, MO
 Quote:
Originally posted by Jalapeño:
What concerns me the most is that I'm going to be working with a 4.5-year-old boy. From what I've been told, very young boys have more problems (than girls) when learning to play piano because their small muscles don't develop as soon. Therefore, even if this boy is bright & talented, I'm most likely going to be dealing with some developmental issues that are going to slow his progress somewhat. For this reason, I want to incorporate as many non-piano musical activities as possible.


Cool! I'm going to start lessons with a 4.5 y/o boy this fall, too, so we'll have to compare notes! I keep hearing "Sing & Play" all over the place, so I guess I'll check it out. Never taught a kid this young, but I'm really eager to see what I can do.

Oh, yeah, and, um *diverting the eyes in mild embarrassment*, how would one go about teaching solfege if one doesn't really actually know solfege? I can still just teach ear training and intervals on a neutral syllable, can't I? Of course, if I don't have to teach that until after this semester, I'll be all set... (8:00 class -- Ear Training & Solfege. How well can one learn to sight-sing when one isn't even awake yet???? :rolleyes: )

[ July 19, 2002: Message edited by: Ars Nova ]

[ July 19, 2002: Message edited by: Ars Nova ]

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#26522 - 07/19/02 06:00 PM Re: Music Makers: At The Keyboard
Jalapeño Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/04/00
Posts: 5712
Burt's has the S&P books in stock, including the teacher's guide. They're prices are a wee bit higher than Stipes, but at least you can either call their 800 # to order or place an order online. If you order directly from Stipes, you have to call long-distance.

Patti & Music Time do not have the S&P bks. in stock. They can backorder them for you, though.

I checked with the local music store here in Lubbock & found out that they've never heard of Stipes Publishing. That explains why I didn't see the books when I visited the store yesterday. What they had was (in no particular order) Faber, Alfred, Schaum, Bastien, Noona, Glover, & Thompson.

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#26523 - 07/19/02 06:25 PM Re: Music Makers: At The Keyboard
John Offline
Star Member

Registered: 03/29/01
Posts: 2454
Loc: Bellingham, WA
Kings Keyboard House in Ann Arbor often has S&P. 1-800-968-5464. They ship anywhere in US.

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#26524 - 07/21/02 02:21 PM Re: Music Makers: At The Keyboard
Jalapeño Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/04/00
Posts: 5712
John Du-de: FYI, upon reading the MFLM teacher's handbook more thoroughly, I see that solfege (at least an introductory sort of thing for pitch recognition) is included in the curriculum.

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#26525 - 07/21/02 03:15 PM Re: Music Makers: At The Keyboard
John Offline
Star Member

Registered: 03/29/01
Posts: 2454
Loc: Bellingham, WA
Unfortunately they limit it to the "Listen and Sing" songs, so you'll need to transfer solfege to all of the Lesson Book pieces. They also use fixed do (so you need to decide if that's your route or not). I'd be sure to stress the concept of major or minor "resting tones" from day one.

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