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#22218 - 08/21/02 05:58 PM Chopin Etudes
MM Offline
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Registered: 12/30/01
Posts: 348
I would like to start on an Etude - probably in January. What would be a good first? I'm working on the Pathetique Sonata (first movement) if that's a good level indicator...

Also, any good recordings of all the etudes? Does Rubinstein have one - I've not been able to locate one?

MM

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#22219 - 08/21/02 09:18 PM Re: Chopin Etudes
Eric Offline
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Registered: 04/04/00
Posts: 2325
Loc: New York, NY
Miss Misti,

I'd be very suspicious of a generalized statement regarding the level of difficulty in the Chopin Etudes. While some might seem to be more manageable than others, it really depends on the individual strengths of the pianist.

For example, I find the C minor (Op.25, No. 12) to be one of the most accessible etudes, but this is probably due to how well it fits my hand and that arpeggios have always come easy to me. Same goes for the Octave Etude (Op. 25, No. 10). But other people would find these two etudes to be among the most difficult. Likewise, some people find the Thirds Etude (Op. 25, No. 6) to be manageable, where it confounds me. Thirds are my weakness! (One among many! ;\) )

That being said, it's safe to say that the F minor (Op. 10 No. 9) and the Aeolian Harp Op. 25 are good starters for most people. If your forte is voicing/phrasing, then the absolutely painfully gorgeous Eb minor (Op. 10, No. 6) might be right up your alley! Like all the etudes, this is as much a study for the heart as it is for the mind and the fingers.

I have Pollini's recording of the complete etudes and I love his subtle performances; He allows the music to speak for itself (which it does very well, thank you) without any excessive interpretive stuff slopped on top. Highly recommended!

[ 08-21-2002: Message edited by: Eric ]

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#22220 - 08/21/02 09:29 PM Re: Chopin Etudes
arsnova02 Offline
Mainstay Member

Registered: 07/29/01
Posts: 908
Loc: St. Louis, MO
I hate them ALL. Boring, boring, boring.

Go for the Liszt Transcendentals instead. (Just JOKING. Don't try it. They might actually kill you. I'm not that brave, either...)

:p

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#22221 - 08/22/02 05:58 AM Re: Chopin Etudes
Jalapeņo Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/04/00
Posts: 5712
My first Chopin etude was the one in E major. I can't say that it was super easy for me to learn it, but I liked the piece so much that I kept working on it until I mastered it. I learned it many moons ago when I was a teenager, but I still love playing it.

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#22222 - 08/22/02 07:15 AM Re: Chopin Etudes
Jason Offline
Star Member

Registered: 05/14/00
Posts: 2019
Loc: Iowa City, IA
We're all assuming Misti means the Chopin Etudes, even though she never specified in her original post.

If you're just looking for etudes in general - you might check out some of the Heller studies. They're actually quite good. As for Chopin, consider Op. 10#3 or #12 or Op. 25#1 or #2.

And don't listen to Ars, she seems to have suffered a mild head injury during her move. They're not boring! :P
_________________________
"If we continually try to force a child to do what he is afraid to do, he will become more timid, and will use his brains and energy, not to explore the unknown, but to find ways to avoid the pressures we put on him." (John Holt)


www.pianoped.com

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#22223 - 08/22/02 07:49 AM Re: Chopin Etudes
MM Offline
Resident Member

Registered: 12/30/01
Posts: 348
Thanks for all of the suggestions - I keep meaning to ask my teacher, but end up forgetting. I'll take more suggestions though!

Sorry Dr. Jason - I meant the Chopin etudes. I assumed that 'etudes' would be understood because of the topic "Chopin Etudes."

Op. 10 #6 is very beautiful (I love pieces like that) but it's in Eb minor... Everything I'm working on now is in a minor key and I'm looking for something kind of bright - or at least major. I like the Winter Wind Etude, but it's in a minor key, too.

Ars - I haven't heard the Liszt pieces, I'll have to see if I can find any of them on the internet, but I already love the Chopin etudes - sorry. ;\)

MM

[ 08-22-2002: Message edited by: Miss Misti ]

[ 01-14-2003: Message edited by: MM ]

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#22224 - 08/22/02 11:00 AM Re: Chopin Etudes
Jalapeņo Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/04/00
Posts: 5712
I second what Jason said about the Heller etudes. I think you'd enjoy doing those in addition to the beloved Chopin etudes. The Liszt etudes may not be suitable for everyone. I seem to remember Eric telling me that the Liszt etudes require a large hand span, which I don't have. For that reason, I never bothered to buy a book & familiarize myself with them. If there are any Liszt etudes that I would be able to play, then please let me know! Maybe I could find individual sheets so as not to have to buy the book???

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#22225 - 08/22/02 11:10 AM Re: Chopin Etudes
Bontempo Offline
Resident Member

Registered: 08/17/02
Posts: 353
Loc: Belgium/Portugal
Hello Misty, being such a fan of these Etudes I just can't help to put in my coin... \:\) What is said in the first reply, by Eric, sums it all. I agree with him on the most widely accepted as the better etudes to start with... I just want to add a few remarks. The op.25 no.2 is also, in my opinion, one that seems to fit most people, as is the Black key Etude. In fact, I started with op.10 no.9, then successively the op.25 no.1, no.2 and the Black Keys. And afterwards the op.25 no.12, although I never could truely master it... \:\(
The "winter wind" is the chromatic A minor, op.10 no.2?? I find that to be a "mine field"!!
Eric, you find the Octave Study fitting to your hand?? How many fingers do you have, anyway?? \:D
Ah, and about recordings, I ADORE the Pollini recording... and just a week ago, I discovered the Cortot original recording in CD (I have to check the date........1933!!) and was absolutely DAZZLED by his incredible performance, totally special-effects-free (with the occasional split notes, op.10 no.1, for one, was recorded in a bad day, I feel! ;\) ), and a lot alike Pollini's interpretation... I wonder if that's just coincidence!
Well, in Portugal the Chopin Etudes are tremendously fashionable right now, and (almost) every student can sing (almost) all of them by memory! But I always remember this sentence, said by a pianist contemporary of Chopin (Sorry, but I don't remember who, it's in the little book inside Pollini's recording):"Players with crooked fingers will straighten them by playing these Etudes, while others should be put on their guard against them...". This is HEAVY ARTILLERY, OK? :p

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#22226 - 08/22/02 12:03 PM Re: Chopin Etudes
Jason Offline
Star Member

Registered: 05/14/00
Posts: 2019
Loc: Iowa City, IA
A small correction, the "Winter Wind" etude is Op. 25#11, not Op. 10#2. Both are very difficult, though!
_________________________
"If we continually try to force a child to do what he is afraid to do, he will become more timid, and will use his brains and energy, not to explore the unknown, but to find ways to avoid the pressures we put on him." (John Holt)


www.pianoped.com

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#22227 - 08/22/02 02:06 PM Re: Chopin Etudes
MM Offline
Resident Member

Registered: 12/30/01
Posts: 348
Does the Pollini recording have all of the etudes on it? It seems to be the PT.com favorite. Once I decide on one, I'll let y'all know how it goes.

MM

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