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#21420 - 09/12/04 11:11 AM interval songs
Carole Offline
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Registered: 06/08/00
Posts: 2229
Loc: southern California
Someone please give me some songs (eartraining purposes)that begin with intervals of a 3rd, 6th and 7th. The only ones I know are too old for kids to know. :rolleyes: Thanks.

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#21421 - 09/12/04 12:21 PM Re: interval songs
Jennifer Online   content
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Registered: 06/05/02
Posts: 1403
Loc: AZ
3rd-
The Bear went over the Mountain
Sweet Hour of Prayer

6th-
My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean

7th-
Superman (do-do-do-ti-do)

That's the best I can do...
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#21422 - 09/12/04 04:22 PM Re: interval songs
newpianoplayer Offline
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Registered: 08/21/02
Posts: 34

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#21423 - 09/12/04 06:21 PM Re: interval songs
Carole Offline
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Registered: 06/08/00
Posts: 2229
Loc: southern California
Thank you very much, Jennifer and Newpianoplayer! Very helpful!

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#21424 - 09/14/04 06:29 AM Re: interval songs
Susan Offline
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Registered: 01/03/01
Posts: 2168
Loc: Texas
Great question and very timely as I am getting students ready for the Texas State Theory test.
I have been successful with Star Wars for a 5th.
Any other hints would be appreciated, especially if they are song the kids of today know.

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#21425 - 09/14/04 11:01 AM Re: interval songs
pianoannie Offline
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Registered: 07/20/01
Posts: 946
Loc: midwest USA
I have a question in general about the idea of using familiar songs for learning intervals. Now, that is how I learned to sight-sing back in jr high (wa-a-a-ay back in jr high, I might add!), and I do find it effective for isolated intervals. That is, if I want to simply sing up a 6th or a m3rd, or whatever, it's easy using the sound of the song in my head.
But am I the only one who finds it a little cumbersome to use this system within the context of pieces? I mean, if the harmony is different than how it sound in the familiar song we're thinking of, it just all sounds wrong.
I used to teach my students intervals exactly as you're talking about (with the songs), but now I'm trying to use just the interval sounds by themselves. Haven't been doing this long enough to know which really works better for my students though.

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#21426 - 09/14/04 11:52 AM Re: interval songs
Lisa Kalmar Offline
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Registered: 04/10/00
Posts: 4277
Loc: KC
Agree. I think solfege works best, but it's hard to incorporate easily into a private lesson.

Mary Gae George does it with numbers in Artistry at the Piano. There are examples in every unit. Those work great also. When you are singing 1-5, for instance, it easily translates into P5 and they don't have to go through mental gymnastics to figure out and then define what they're hearing.

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#21427 - 09/15/04 05:58 AM Re: interval songs
Susan Offline
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Registered: 01/03/01
Posts: 2168
Loc: Texas
Solfege works a lot better than numbers I think. I learned both in different colleges and I had to admit the solfege was better. I trained as a Kodaly teacher and solfege is great to teach sight singing.
But if you just want children at piano lessons to identify INTERVALS quickly [as they have to do on the state theory exams,]using songs to learn the intervals is fast and efficient.
Unfortunatly I don't have time in lessons to teach solfege sight singing. I think it requires a daily class to really be proficient. They do learn to take dictation.
You are right about trying to remember songs while taking music dictation. It just doesn't work. But if you know a song for each interval and practice singing them, over a period of time you don't need the song as a crutch and can identify them without the song. That is what we did at university. Isn't that what every music major does, except for those lucky ones with perfect pitch?

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#21428 - 09/15/04 06:56 AM Re: interval songs
pianoannie Offline
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Registered: 07/20/01
Posts: 946
Loc: midwest USA
Susan, I agree with what you said but it raises another question. In view of the fact that knowing intervals via familiar songs doesn't work well within the context of pieces, and solfege is difficult to teach in a once a week lesson, does it actually serve a concrete purpose for most piano students to learn the sound of intervals? (I almost feel blasphemous even asking this!) But my thinking is, since within the context of a piece, where the harmony may be totally different than what is present in the familiar song, that system doesn't really help all that much in sightreading or mentally "hearing" the piece.
Other than needing it for theory exams, can anyone give me concrete ways that having students know intervals translates into better piano playing? (and also please share which system you use to teach intervals).
Thanks!

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#21429 - 09/15/04 07:06 AM Re: interval songs
shannonspiano Offline
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Registered: 07/01/04
Posts: 694
Loc: WI
Well knowing intervals helps me know better what to listen for when i'm teaching new songs. In college i used used recongnizable songs, and singing chords. Singing the chords seemed to help if it wasn't in the close key. As far as for student's go, I too am not really sure it's worth teaching. Unless they are wanting to write down a song or play by ear.
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#21430 - 09/15/04 07:08 AM Re: interval songs
Susan Offline
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Registered: 01/03/01
Posts: 2168
Loc: Texas
Pianoannie, everything you say is true. I guess you're asking why bother to teach intervals if they are not going to be taking a state theory test?
I remember auditioning for All State chorus in high school. I was given a note and asked to sing intervals. I gave him a blank look and he said with disgust, "You've had how many years of piano and can't sing a 4th?" Then I realized what he wanted and did it. I had never done it before but I have a good ear and just did it. I made All State choir.
Later my choir teacher said she didn't know they were going to ask that.
We can only do so much in a 30 minute lesson, but intervals are so easy to teach, why not? You never know when it might come in handy.
Several of my students have auditioned for special choirs, band, or orchestra. I have had a few students major or minor in music and I had no idea when I was teaching them that is what they were going to do.

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#21431 - 09/15/04 09:31 PM Re: interval songs
pianoannie Offline
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Registered: 07/20/01
Posts: 946
Loc: midwest USA
 Quote:
Originally posted by Susan:
Pianoannie, everything you say is true. I guess you're asking why bother to teach intervals if they are not going to be taking a state theory test?


Well, no, that's not really what I'm asking. I do teach intervals as do all teachers I know (which is why I said it almost felt blasphemous to ask the question). ;\) I guess I'm wondering if other teachers are doing a better job than I am at actually seeing their students USE their interval training to become better sightreaders, better pianists in general? There's got to be more reason than just scoring well on the exams!

I do think that being able to sightsing helps in sightreading piano. And I'm pretty strong at sightsinging. But that was from having years of daily classes in which it was taught and used.

I still think it's good for students to at least be exposed to the idea that they can "hear" intervals just by seeing them on the page, and to be able to recognize and sing intervals (even using the familiar song method). Unfortunately, once a week piano lessons, in my opinion and experience, don't allow this skill sufficient development to translate into much practical use in their piano playing.

I'd love to hear other teachers' specific examples of how their students do put their interval training into practical use.

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#21432 - 09/18/04 03:32 PM Re: interval songs
Susan Offline
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Registered: 01/03/01
Posts: 2168
Loc: Texas
 Quote:
I guess I'm wondering if other teachers are doing a better job than I am at actually seeing their students USE their interval training to become better sightreaders, better pianists in
general?


I don't think of it in that way. I don't think of them just becomimg better pianists, but better musicians in general. Learning intervals is the first step to hearing music, sight singing and sight reading.

I was dictating a short melody Thursday for a student to write. I heard her sing the intervals to herself and as she wrote down the melody.

I handed a new piece to a student and she starting sight singing it by ear.

I use my ear training skills every day as a teacher, don't you? Teaching ear training is part of preparing them as musicians.

There are a lot of teachers who don't teach these skills, and then when the student goes off to major or minor in music, they last about 1 semester. I'm sure you saw this in college, too. I want my students to be able to do more than just play pretty pieces.

I suppose being able to identify a minor 6th won't help a student perform better. Otherwise, why do college professors complain all the time about students who can play very well, but can't sight read or sight sing?

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