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#14553 - 02/06/02 06:54 PM Re: inspiring teenage students
Rhapsody Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/19/00
Posts: 2329
Vivace,

Your music club meetings sound like so much fun that I want to live on Fantasy Island, too. Or at least visit once in a while. Are the meetings open to visitors? \:\)

I always love your "comic books" and "appliances" comments. Please share additional phrases whenever you like. \:D

Melody,

Could it be just the winter "blahs" :p \:\( that both you and your students are going through? To perk up a dark wintry lesson, a little dance music can work wonders. At the beginning of the lesson, have the student play (or with you as a duet) a rollicking jig (or gigue) or Hungarian Dance or Slavonic Dance. Doesn't it always seem from the dance music that the peasants had a lot more fun than the aristocrats?

There are so many ways to spark interest and motivate, and it varies so greatly from student to student, but sometimes it's really simple. Just a little something new or even simply a reordering of what's done when in the lesson can liven up things a bit. Keep striving to motivate and inspire and it will happen. \:\)
_________________________
There is no cure for boring.

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#14554 - 02/06/02 07:37 PM Re: inspiring teenage students
Vivace' Offline
Star Member

Registered: 05/25/01
Posts: 1717
Loc: USA
Rhapsody,
Visitors are always welcome at club meetings, ya'll come on down heah.
\:\)
_________________________
Then let us all do what is right, strive with all our might toward the unattainable, develop as fully as we can the gifts God has given us,and never stop learning." ~ Ludwig van Beethoven

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#14555 - 02/07/02 06:25 AM Re: inspiring teenage students
Jalapeņo Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/04/00
Posts: 5712
 Quote:
Originally posted by Vivace:
Jala,
I know how you love the "comic book" comment so I added it just for you!
\:\)


I know. \:D No offense taken. ;\)

Actually, for the most part I agree with you. What I do is explain to students that the core method books (lessons, technique & theory) comprise the "Main Course" (meat & potatoes) & that the supplementary books are "Dessert." Sure, I'll work with them on music they want to play. Why not? But in return, they must use the "Main Course" books & complete all their assignments. And the "Main Course" is always offered before dessert, not after! \:\) Most people respond favorably to this approach because they see that I'm flexible & willing to work with them, but that at the same time I am a conscientious teacher who wants to make sure that they learn what they're supposed to learn. \:\)

Living on Fantasy Island has its drawbacks. We're not close to civilization; the PA NR shipments arrive so late that when we see the boxes we exclaim, "Da books! Da books!" \:D

[ February 07, 2002: Message edited by: Jalapeņo ]

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#14556 - 02/07/02 06:13 PM Re: inspiring teenage students
Chanson Offline
New Member

Registered: 02/07/02
Posts: 7
Loc: Houston
I would like very much to know how to get to the Mayron Cole site. I would like to learn more about her ideas for musicals.
_________________________
Chanson

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#14557 - 02/07/02 06:19 PM Re: inspiring teenage students
Rhapsody Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/19/00
Posts: 2329


Just click and you're there. And welcome to our site, Chanson.
_________________________
There is no cure for boring.

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#14558 - 02/07/02 06:22 PM Re: inspiring teenage students
Chanson Offline
New Member

Registered: 02/07/02
Posts: 7
Loc: Houston
Thank you so very very much.
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Chanson

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#14559 - 02/10/02 08:19 AM Re: inspiring teenage students
GeeTee Offline
Resident Member

Registered: 12/26/01
Posts: 391
Loc: Midwest
For whatever it's worth...I recently spoke with an out of state friend who's daughter is taking piano lessons. I was asking about her teacher, methods, etc. and learned something quite intriguing...this teacher, as part of her policy, offers two different piano courses of study for students beyond the elementary method level.

The first one is the traditional course. Here the student follows a typical course of study with Classical music as the core repertoire, theory, basic supplementary stuff from the jazz, sacred, etc. genres. This course requires a certain amount of practice weekly and allows the student to participate in regularly scheduled recitals. Also, as part of this course, the last lesson of each month is used for games, theory & composition work, etc. in lui of a regular lesson.

The second course is called Piano Explorations and is designed as a less intense approach. It is geared more for students who need a continuation of piano study, but have little time or motivation to practice. The students in this course do not perform at recitals or contests, Guild, etc. and the students can work on lighter fair along with music ed. games, software games, etc. They participate in sightreading activities as well. Basically, this course is for those who want to keep taking lessons but are not too motivated to put much into their practicing. They don't even have to practice during the week since most of the activities are prepared during the lesson. Evidently everyone realizes that their playing progress will slow down big time. But it may be what they need to keep them coming and learning something.

Now, the neat thing I learned is that students and parents can decide which curriculum best suits their needs and are free to choose one or the other. Also, they can switch between the two as needed. However, it is assumed that students using the "lighter" course will eventually switch to the traditional one in time.

Personally, I like this idea and think that the Explorations course could prove valuable for those students who need a more relaxed curriculum for a time.

GeeTee

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#14560 - 02/11/02 10:58 AM Re: inspiring teenage students
Melody Offline
Contributing Member

Registered: 03/05/01
Posts: 18
Loc: North Ridgeville, OH USA
This past weekend I went to a music seminar for contemporary Christian music in church services - Praise and Worship. I talked with one of the keyboard speakers who encouraged me to begin teaching my jr. high students chording. He said much of today's music deals with chording and improvising and kids want to play music they are familiar with.
I've been teaching chords - triads and inversions - but he suggested showing them how to improvise. Anyone have any experience with this?
I use chording and improvising in church, but it is something I picked up on my own. To plan lessons to teach it to someone else is going to be a challenge. I do find that I enjoy the times I just sit and play whatever comes to mind. But, I also enjoy sitting down and learning an actual piece. I would like to balance both types of training in a lesson, but it's going to take a lot of trial and error.

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#14561 - 02/11/02 11:23 AM Re: inspiring teenage students
Jalapeņo Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/04/00
Posts: 5712
My piano teacher taught me basic chords & inversions, then taught me various "runs," "fills" & "intros." After that, she taught me how to modulate from one key to another; this skill is important, because many song leaders like to string choruses together, & they frequently change keys as well. Also, the sooner your students can play in all keys, the better. Some song leaders (esp. in pentecostal circles) just start singing, & the pianist is left to figure out which key s/he is singing in, & start accompanying. One last thing I might mention is that, when accompanying congregational singing, it's best if the pianist emphasizes the melody so everyone stays on track. Some pianists just chord along, & that's okay, but sometimes it confuses people. It's better to include the melody in whatever accompaniment you come up with, & make sure it's heard. Even if your church has an orchestra, the pianist generally takes the lead. The only exception would be if there's an organist playing hymn style, loud & clear; in that case, the pianist can take more liberties & leave the melody completely out if s/he wants.

Hope this helps. \:\)

Jalapeņo "Been There, Done That" Pepper

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#14562 - 02/16/02 02:55 PM Re: inspiring teenage students
Joy123 Offline
Mainstay Member

Registered: 05/22/00
Posts: 566
Melody, I have done this type of thing for years myself and have also taught it. If you want an easy to follow METHOD for chording and improvising on church music that will save you valuable time, check out THE HENRY SLAUGHTER GOSPEL PIANO COURSE.

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