Page 2 of 2 < 1 2
Topic Options
#14352 - 11/11/01 01:00 AM Re: Motivation Through Listening
Piano lady Offline
Resident Member

Registered: 08/19/01
Posts: 361
Beethoven: The classicist or romanticist approach. Interesting.

It depends upon the piece, the mood, and the period of the piece. Late would have more romantic qualities than say the Op 2 #1. The rubato should be there but not intrusive. Strict tempo no. Tempo fluctuation yes, but not sudden unless designated by the god himself.

Schubert goes one way then suddenly takes off in another key and a completely different mood. Romantic is the only way to go with Schubert.

Top
#14353 - 11/14/01 08:03 AM Re: Motivation Through Listening
songbird Offline
Resident Member

Registered: 03/06/01
Posts: 425
Loc: USA
.

[ November 14, 2001: Message edited by: songbird ]

Top
#14354 - 11/14/01 08:05 AM Re: Motivation Through Listening
songbird Offline
Resident Member

Registered: 03/06/01
Posts: 425
Loc: USA
 Quote:
Originally posted by Eric:


As beautiful as it is, I DO wish I could interest Junior High girls into some other bit of classical piano music. This seems to still be #1 on the Charts! Maybe the recordings suggested in this thread can open up their view of classical music so they WILL want to play something other than the unfortunately overplayed and rarely-played-well Fur Elise!



I think Fur Elise is just one of those familiar tunes that almost every student wants to learn at some point. As teachers, we hear it more often than our students do, so of course, it becomes TEDIOUS to hear it played repeatedly in an uninteresting fashion. However, I do think it has its merits in a student's repertoire, as a motivational piece. But I think you're right. Many teachers I've come across (many of them inexperienced ones at that) jump to Fur Elise as the first "Classical" (if you want to call it that, which I prefer not to) piece that students play, when there is so much other engaging repertoire out there for students at varying levels to play.

I met somebody the other day who found out I teach piano, and she immediately asked, with big, fascinated eyes, "Oh, can you play Fur Elise?" Perhaps Beethoven's most famous piece, other than Ode to Joy, which I am also getting tired of teaching (Sorry! I know, I must be a bad teacher!). It's in PA Primer, and it's also in the Accelerated Books. I now have 6 students who want to perform that at the next recital! Wonder who'll get dibs on it.

[ November 14, 2001: Message edited by: songbird ]

Top
#14355 - 11/14/01 08:14 AM Re: Motivation Through Listening
songbird Offline
Resident Member

Registered: 03/06/01
Posts: 425
Loc: USA
 Quote:
Originally posted by Piano lady:

Schubert goes one way then suddenly takes off in another key and a completely different mood. Romantic is the only way to go with Schubert.


Boy, I have a hard time with Schubert's Impromptus, especially the one in E flat major. How do you get a handle on that left hand??? It's TOO LOUD and I have no control on it. I'm about to give up. Any ideas??? (I do not have a wide hand-span)

Top
Page 2 of 2 < 1 2


Moderator:  Archivist 
Search

Recent Posts
Top Posters (Last 30 Days)
Newest Members
mypianorotebook, Amber_Bagz, 430725, SKaR, adagiok5
2658 Registered Users
Forum Stats
2658 Members
46 Forums
5771 Topics
62996 Posts

Max Online: 1422 @ 10/03/16 05:11 PM