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#14314 - 12/03/01 08:58 AM Motivation through Money
Jalapeņo Offline
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Registered: 11/04/00
Posts: 5712
I wasn't sure where to put this topic, but this thread seems like the best place. ;\)

I was wondering if offering parents some sort of rebate program (perhaps in the form of a credit on their account) would be a good way to motivate them to see to it that their children don't miss any lessons & that they practice regularly? The parents could receive the rebate at the end of each year of lessons or something. What do ya'll think?

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#14315 - 12/03/01 09:11 AM Re: Motivation through Money
Jason Offline
Star Member

Registered: 05/14/00
Posts: 2019
Loc: Iowa City, IA
I doubt it would work. No reason, just instinct.

I also don't believe in rewarding people for doing what's expected of them.
_________________________
"If we continually try to force a child to do what he is afraid to do, he will become more timid, and will use his brains and energy, not to explore the unknown, but to find ways to avoid the pressures we put on him." (John Holt)


www.pianoped.com

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#14316 - 12/03/01 09:26 AM Re: Motivation through Money
Janice Offline
Mainstay Member

Registered: 01/19/01
Posts: 565
Loc: Newalla, Oklahoma, USA
I agree with Jason, however, I have had a few parents that use money as motivation with their children. They use piano practice as part of their "chores" and they lost money if they failed to do their part. I had 3 families that I know about that did this and the kids were all good students. I think all bribes should be up to the parent. The bookkeeping could get really terrible but the idea isn't bad. \:D I really feel the best reward is feeling good about yourself.

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#14317 - 12/03/01 06:39 PM Re: Motivation through Money
bethann Offline
Resident Member

Registered: 10/12/00
Posts: 359
Loc: Nebraska
Jalapeno,

I don't think it's necessarily bad to offer an incentive to those who don't miss any lessons. But the practice thing could get a little sticky (for example, could parents insist their child IS practicing regularly, and just not getting any better?) Plus, even though I do think parents need to encourage children to practice, the student needs to be awarded for consistent practice, not the parent. Maybe they could work their way toward a supplementary book of their choice or some other piano-related need.

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#14318 - 12/03/01 07:05 PM Re: Motivation through Money
Lisa Kalmar Offline
Star Member

Registered: 04/10/00
Posts: 4277
Loc: KC
I'm with Jason.

Plus, Bethann makes excellent points.

Even when I used to run my lil' Spring Fling Practice Contests there were always parents who signed that their kid had practiced consistently when it was crystal clear it hadn't happened, and THAT was just for a medallion, sigh.

Face it: we have no control over people's choices and to presume or try otherwise to change 'em is a never ending battle.

Tis better to just follow the motto of the Brownies and Be Our Best at all Times, letting the chips fall where they may whilst knowing we did what we could.

Lisa, now imagining what Jalapeno is thinking about that wee bit o' advice!

[ December 03, 2001: Message edited by: Lisa Kalmar ]

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#14319 - 12/03/01 08:13 PM Re: Motivation through Money
Jalapeņo Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/04/00
Posts: 5712
You folks have brought up some interesting points. It's certainly true that many parents are not above signing that their children practiced a certain amount of time when all the evidence points to the contrary. :rolleyes: However, I was thinking that the rebate incentive could have some strings attached ['cuz I don't think I'm that naive ;)] such as regular attendance (including summer study) & a good practice record as evidenced by successful completion of all assigned work in a certain length of time (say, completing primer level in less than 12 months' time? I'm thinking here that it should not take anyone more than 6 months to finish primer, but I'm cutting people some slack; I've had students that have taken as long as 1.5 or 2 years to get through primer).

Yes, I agree that students should be rewarded. However, I've had parentally challenged students before--students who expressed interest & had loads of talent, but whose parents had them enrolled in too many extracurricular activites, took a lot of vacations, etc. & therefore weren't even home long enough for the poor kids to practice & progress.

Additional thoughts anyone?

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#14320 - 12/03/01 09:12 PM Re: Motivation through Money
Josh Allen Offline
Mainstay Member

Registered: 06/15/00
Posts: 534
Loc: East Texas, USA
Money rewards would only appeal to parents and I've never thought it was my job to motivate parents--just my students (even though I may end up doing both). Besides, I'm worth every penny I am paid because I don't just devote 45 minutes to each student, I spend countless hours outside of lessons bettering myself as a teacher and preparing to teach again. So to base a money-return program on the STUDENT seems to cut the teacher (who prepares for each student, whether that student does well or no) a little short.

However, I will say that I have offered scholarships before. For example, I am now offering a full "Material" scholarship to a family who has two girls enrolled. They pay tuition every month and I do not charge the girls for books that I buy for their use (a lot of times, I use things in my library).

I offered this because:
1) I wanted to
2) The girls are always prepared for lessons and have a desire to better their playing skills
3) The cost of books is a financial burden but the parents were willing to have their daughters continue to take in spite of it
4) Again, I felt like it \:D

Now, the scholarship is no one's business but mine, the students (and their parents), God, and (of course) the IRS ;\)

But a "money-back" policy would be hard for me to embrace. But what works for me doesn't always work for everybody and vica versa!

Josh, I'm in the money--the monopoly money, Allen

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#14321 - 12/04/01 07:45 AM Re: Motivation through Money
Jalapeņo Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/04/00
Posts: 5712
I don't know what the difference is between offering a rebate (AKA money back) & offering to provide books. The teacher loses money both ways... unless there's a tax advantage in providing books that I'm not aware of. If so, please enlighten me.

I don't like the idea of giving any money back, either. I just know that the gimmicky prizes don't work with students, so I'm trying to think of ways to motivate the parents to motivate their own kids. Since parents are naturally more concerned about their pocketbooks than anyone else (I know that I sure am. I'm always looking for ways to cut corners & save money), I thought the rebate thing might work. Then again, it might not. I've never tried it.

But think about all the companies that offer rebates & incentives to sell their products. It must be working or they wouldn't keep doing it, right? You can't tell me that large corporations are not concerned about the bottom line: profits. ;\)

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#14322 - 12/04/01 08:33 AM Re: Motivation through Money
Jason Offline
Star Member

Registered: 05/14/00
Posts: 2019
Loc: Iowa City, IA
Yes, but think of all the service fields that don't offer rebates and incentives. I've never seen any kind of rebate come from lawyers, doctors, educators, consultants, or therapists/counselors. Except for the occasional first free visit or free consultation, these people state their price and that's that.

 Quote:
Originally posted by Jalapeņo:
But think about all the companies that offer rebates & incentives to sell their products. It must be working or they wouldn't keep doing it, right? You can't tell me that large corporations are not concerned about the bottom line: profits. ;\)
_________________________
"If we continually try to force a child to do what he is afraid to do, he will become more timid, and will use his brains and energy, not to explore the unknown, but to find ways to avoid the pressures we put on him." (John Holt)


www.pianoped.com

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#14323 - 12/04/01 09:01 AM Re: Motivation through Money
Eric Offline
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Registered: 04/04/00
Posts: 2325
Loc: New York, NY
Offering a rebate will attract the very parents (the "problem" ones) which you do not want in your studio. Good parents will take it upon themselves to encourage their children out of love and care for them, not out of financial gain.

One important point to consider about money: The more people pay for something, the more they will tend to value it. Special money-back offers de-value the lessons. So, if you want to attract parents and students who will truly value, respect and commit to piano study, make sure you are charging a rate which you deserve.

I feel that what I offer in lessons should be equivalent in money-value to private psychotherapy. (No, this isn't another plug for you to go to a shrink! ;\) \:D ) Now, what would I think of a psychotherapist who offered a special rebate if I came on time to each session and had good dreams to discuss? No respectable therapist would offer such a deal, would they? And isn't private music instruction as valuable, if not moreso, than psychotherapy? I suggest you find out how much therapists in your area charge per session, and consider charging the same for lessons.

I guess what I'm saying is that in terms of the title of this thread, "Motivation through Money"....ironically, charging MORE will be better motivation than charging less or offering rebates. Make sense?

[ December 04, 2001: Message edited by: Eric ]

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#14324 - 12/04/01 09:18 AM Re: Motivation through Money
Lisa Kalmar Offline
Star Member

Registered: 04/10/00
Posts: 4277
Loc: KC
Just out of curiosity, Dr. Kalmarstein would like to know what your INTENTION is here. In your Days of Anguish after the last students left you you bemoaned the fact that you'd done everything, including rate cutting, to appease these people and that nevuh, no nevuh, again would you be a doormat.

Offering a gimmicky price rebate for something that's just part of the lesson process is the equivalent of hanging a sign out that says BITE ME.

Getting back to intention for a moment, the Good Doctor would like to get to the root of the problem. It appears that the issue is one of control between you and the parental units. WHY??? What is this really about? There is a spiritual principle at work that says whenever our intentions are not lined up with the greater good stuff will backfire and bite us bigtime in the arse. You've shared how this has taken it's nibbles from you time and time again. Why the resistance to change? ;\)

Psssst, PJ! Help me out here. It'll drive Eric Kapital K Krazy!

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#14325 - 12/04/01 10:26 AM Re: Motivation through Money
Eric Offline
Star Member

Registered: 04/04/00
Posts: 2325
Loc: New York, NY
 Quote:
Originally posted by Lisa Kalmar:

Offering a gimmicky price rebate for something that's just part of the lesson process is the equivalent of hanging a sign out that says BITE ME.


True. \:\)

 Quote:
Originally posted by Lisa Kalmar:

There is a spiritual principle at work that says whenever our intentions are not lined up with the greater good stuff will backfire and bite us bigtime in the arse.


False. :p

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#14326 - 12/04/01 12:35 PM Re: Motivation through Money
John Offline
Star Member

Registered: 03/29/01
Posts: 2454
Loc: Bellingham, WA
 Quote:
Originally posted by Eric:
False. :p


FALSE! Maybe your own karma has bitten toi in ye ol' backside already...you just haven't made the connection (yet).

Double :p :p

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#14327 - 12/04/01 01:34 PM Re: Motivation through Money
PJ Offline
Contributing Member

Registered: 08/06/01
Posts: 43
Loc: Scottsdale, Arizona
I've been called to defend Lisa's position, but I see that John has already done it for me! He is one cool dude!

What Lisa described as a spiritual principle is actually THE most important, unerring, perfect and absolute Principle operating in the Universe. The Universe runs under a system of Perfect Justice. Not only does every action have a result, every cause an effect, but every Intention produces Feedback. So Lisa's right (Sorry Eric) ~ If we experience negativity, we need to carefully examine our intentions as well as our actions.

Jalapeņo's intentions might seem to be totally cool on the surface, but if on some deeper level she is trying to manipulate others or trying to accomplish her own Ego-driven goal, there will be bad feedback, I promise. Jalapeņo, you should examine WHY you want your students to do well in the first place. Is it for them, or is it for your own Ego needs? If your heart is aligned with the greater good of your students, you will see great empowerment in your teaching. If instead, you are like desiring good students to serve your own ego needs....you will encounter major obstacles.

It takes careful and loving reflection and mindfulness to be AWARE of the relationship between the intentions and the kicks in the arse!

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#14328 - 12/04/01 02:53 PM Re: Motivation through Money
Jason Offline
Star Member

Registered: 05/14/00
Posts: 2019
Loc: Iowa City, IA
And here silly me, thinking it was gravity or somethin'. \:\)

 Quote:
Originally posted by PJ:

What Lisa described as a spiritual principle is actually THE most important, unerring, perfect and absolute Principle operating in the Universe.
_________________________
"If we continually try to force a child to do what he is afraid to do, he will become more timid, and will use his brains and energy, not to explore the unknown, but to find ways to avoid the pressures we put on him." (John Holt)


www.pianoped.com

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#14329 - 12/04/01 03:18 PM Re: Motivation through Money
Rhapsody Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/19/00
Posts: 2329
PJ,

I agree with you completely -- John is very cool.

Jason,

I agree with you completely -- "somethin'" is the Perfect, Universal Principle. \:\)
_________________________
There is no cure for boring.

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#14330 - 12/04/01 03:43 PM Re: Motivation through Money
Jalapeņo Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/04/00
Posts: 5712
I just doubled my tuition rate, & that's what my one & only student's parents are paying me (thank the good Lord). \:\) I don't have any rebates or incentives in place, other than offering a $20 credit for each referral that results in an enrollment.

I just wonder if there's a way to somehow motivate parents to take a more active role in their children's musical education. Ego? I don't think so. I just know that the vast majority of piano students are not going to do well without parental involvement & support. I consider parental involvement as being one of the main ingredients in a student's success. How many students do you think are going to diligently practice, on a regular (daily) basis, without parents setting aside a certain time each day for practice & at least reminding them that they need to practice? How many young students (under age 8) do you think are going to practice without being told to do so? Even if they love piano lessons & love playing the piano, there will be weeks when they won't want to practice unless Mom or Dad makes them.

I guess there's a fine line in determining whether a teacher wants a student to succeed because of the teacher's ego or because the teacher honestly & truly wants to see the student do well. I submit that very few teachers can truthfully say that they're happy with a studio full of students who hardly ever practice & whose parents don't seem to care. [Let's get real here, folks! ] Furthermore, if any teachers like that exist, I say they shouldn't be teaching. IMO, all teachers should want their students to make steady progress. I, for one, would not think of sending my children to any teacher who displayed a nonchalant attitude about their progress. But maybe I'm different than most parents. \:D

At any rate, I posted this "Motivation through Money" thread out of curiosity, because I just wonder if a financial incentive would perhaps spark some parents to see to it that their children don't miss lessons & that they practice regularly. It's not something I necessarily feel like doing. I'm just thinking out loud. Haven't any of you folks ever done that? Haven't you ever brainstormed before? Do you ever try to think of creative ways to do things? Something out of the ordinary? Just curious...

So many people these days suffer from a condition I call affluenza. Their kids already have so many toys, etc. that the little gimmicky prizes we piano teachers offer to get them to practice just don't work (at least, not for long).

And Jason, the reason that medical doctors, lawyers & other professionals don't offer rebates is because they know that people need medical care, legal counsel, etc. The rebates are offered by companies who are selling things that are not really necessary, but that they know people might purchase if given an incentive. For most people, whether we like it or not, piano lessons fits into this category. It's not a necessity for most people. The people that really think it's important are going to pay whatever they need to pay. That is definitely true. But the other 99% of piano students who enroll for lessons are going to consider money, at least a little bit. And perhaps [again, I'm not thinking of doing this, I'm just in an argumentive mood today. :p ;)] offering a rebate or credit once a year might entice parents to do their part. Just maybe... But we'll never know, will we? We're too afraid to try something this unconventional. [I include myself in this statement. I don't feel like losing money, either. ;)]

[ December 04, 2001: Message edited by: Jalapeņo ]

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#14331 - 12/04/01 04:29 PM Re: Motivation through Money
Rhapsody Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/19/00
Posts: 2329
Jalapeņo,

Both Jason and Eric make good cases against not offering a rebate.

If you want parents to be more involved, make sure they know exactly what to do. Explain it in person and via a handout. If they are not musicians themselves they may have no clue and may not want to interfere in case they might do something counterproductive. Regularly ask if they have any new questions regarding their role in their child's piano study. Possibly schedule a quarterly or semi-annual session for all the parents in a group (when you have more students) to save time and perhaps let the parents get the feeling that other share their concerns and desires.

I don't think it's so much a question of ego
as it is a love of musical accomplishment and wanting students to do well. It naturally makes you feel better and may enhance your ego but I don't think ego is the underlying reason for desiring progress or excellence. Knowing the benefit of success and wanting others to share in that and the joy of music is not a selfish thing.
_________________________
There is no cure for boring.

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#14332 - 12/05/01 09:34 AM Re: Motivation through Money
Eric Offline
Star Member

Registered: 04/04/00
Posts: 2325
Loc: New York, NY
 Quote:
Originally posted by PJ:
The Universe runs under a system of Perfect Justice. Not only does every action have a result, every cause an effect, but every Intention produces Feedback. If we experience negativity, we need to carefully examine our intentions as well as our actions.


Gosh, we're gonna have to revisit the Philosophy Thread. From your perspective, PJ, a person who is suffering from a debilitating disease somehow deserves it, the people lost in the World Trade Center had it coming, and the Jews in Nazi Germany needed to examine their intentions.

While I agree with Lisa that examining our intentions is always worthwhile, I wholeheartedly disagree with your notion that every Kick in the Arse we get in Life is somehow deserved in a universe of perfect justice. :rolleyes:

But back to the subject...Jalapeno, keep going with the creative ideas. Maybe rather than a rebate, offering the first lesson free would bring you some interested students. Then during their free lesson you get them hooked on piano! Good luck!

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#14333 - 12/05/01 09:34 AM Re: Motivation through Money
Jalapeņo Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/04/00
Posts: 5712
Originally posted by Rhapsody:
Jalapeņo,

Both Jason and Eric make good cases against not offering a rebate.


Yes, they do. However, I'm still not sure that some parents wouldn't be motivated by a rebate or credit to their account--some sort of financial incentive. That's not to say I'd do it. I just think it might work with a few families. But, hey, I've been wrong before. ;\)

I'm never quite sure if my philsophy should be nothing ventured, nothing gained or nothing ventured, nothing lost.

If you want parents to be more involved, make sure they know exactly what to do. Explain it in person and via a handout. If they are not musicians themselves they may have no clue and may not want to interfere in case they might do something counterproductive. Regularly ask if they have any new questions regarding their role in their child's piano study. Possibly schedule a quarterly or semi-annual session for all the parents in a group (when you have more students) to save time and perhaps let the parents get the feeling that other share their concerns and desires.

I go through everything with parents & students at the initial interview, after which they receive a handout to take home with them. I also keep in touch with parents on a weekly basis & maintain open communication regarding repertoire (what they'd like to work on), what's going on at home, etc. I've found that people respond very positively to this approach & even brag to me about how happy they are with their children's progress & with the books & CDs.

Things start falling apart, though, when parents don't supervise their children's practice sessions & think I'm totally responsible for keeping their children motivated. While I certainly agree that children need a happy, enthusiastic teacher who is willing to change his/her method or approach to fit each individual student's learning style & musical tastes, it never ceases to amaze me how parents can think that they, too, need to be involved in their children's musical education. There might be exceptions to the rule, but I've found that when parents are interested & involved in what their children are doing, the children become interested (& stay interested). When parents are not interested & involved, the children soon lose interest. I'd like for parents to understand the importance of their role in the teacher-student-parent triangle, but as of yet I haven't found an effective way to get this message across. The minute their children start complaining about having to practice or about having to do written theory work or about having to work on the computer (yes, I've had students who don't like the computer software; my daughters love it), the parents pull their children out of my studio, without even giving me advance notice. I am therefore robbed of the opportunity to switch gears & try a different approach. I'm also left without the benefit of receiving feedback from them about what they feel went wrong. So if there are problems with the way I teach or the way I approach things, I can't fix them because I don't know what they are. I'm supposed to be God or something, I guess. I'm supposed to read people's minds & know what makes them unmotivated & unhappy.

I don't think it's so much a question of ego as it is a love of musical accomplishment and wanting students to do well. It naturally makes you feel better and may enhance your ego but I don't think ego is the underlying reason for desiring progress or excellence. Knowing the benefit of success and wanting others to share in that and the joy of music is not a selfish thing.

Exactly. \:D

[ December 05, 2001: Message edited by: Jalapeņo ]

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#14334 - 12/13/01 10:14 AM Re: Motivation through Money
PJ Offline
Contributing Member

Registered: 08/06/01
Posts: 43
Loc: Scottsdale, Arizona
Eric, you totally misinterpreted what I said, but that's nothing new. I wasn't talking about Nazis and stuff. I was just saying that everything that happens in our life is the effect of some cause, which lies in our actions, beliefs and intentions.

Jalapeņo, I just wrote in another thread that you distrust people and I might be totally wrong about that. But instead of anticipating the worst in people, and assuming that something as shallow as a money rebate would motivate them, why not try assuming the BEST in people? What you assume about the world is what the world will manifest. If you give all your energy to these ideas that parents are irresponsible, you will be encountering them in your life. If you plan for the worst, you'll GET the worst! Give yourself a time-out and choose to change your view of the Universe. If you see it as an essentially GOOD place, you will have awesome experiences!

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#14335 - 12/13/01 10:58 AM Re: Motivation through Money
Eric Offline
Star Member

Registered: 04/04/00
Posts: 2325
Loc: New York, NY
PJ (or puppeteer in charge ;\) ):

Believe it or not we agree, well, sort of. If you check out this old thread Arrrggh you'll see that I was confronting Jalapeno on similar grounds. All I was saying then was that a lot of the negativity our good friend Jala encounters might be initiated by her beliefs/worldview, which seems to be what you're saying. Difference is, of course, that I attribute such things to psychological forces rather than mystical "Universe" powers. I think a lot of bad stuff just happens and it's not due to any belief or action on the part of the victim. But sometimes I think people subconsciously create circumstances that reinforce their view of the world. So, I guess in some ways I'm as Looney as you are!

Back to the topic of this thread, I maintain that if you offer bargains, you will attract people who are interested in bargains. Instead, offer quality, and you'll attract a more desirable clientele!

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#14336 - 12/13/01 12:03 PM Re: Motivation through Money
Jalapeņo Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/04/00
Posts: 5712
I'm sure my Honda's not running properly because of a negative viewpoint on my part, too. :rolleyes: Come on, people! Give it a rest.

I'll buy Eric's notion that if you offer a bargain, you'll most likely attract people who are looking for a bargain. But since I didn't have problems like this until opening up a piano studio here in Lubbock, I think that either the teaching environment here is not very good, or I haven't yet learned how to effectively work with the people here. Either way, it's not because I don't initially trust people. On the contrary, I think that a lot of stuff happens because I start out assuming that other people do business the way I do (I always pay my bills ASAP, give as much advance notice as possible when I'm forced to cancel an appointment, always arrive a little early or on time for appointments, etc.). Then when people don't do these things, I'm majorly disappointed, especially when it appears to happen with almost all the people that enroll their children for lessons, not just a small percentage of people.

I've come to the conclusion that it's better to expect less & charge more, rather than expect more & charge less.

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#14337 - 12/13/01 04:58 PM Re: Motivation through Money
MeLisa Offline
Regular Member

Registered: 11/08/01
Posts: 83
Hi, From a student (and parent) point of view, if money is non issue, I am willing to pay more as long as I know I am getting what I paid for.

On the otherhand if I am not wealthy, I dont think I would choose a cheaper teacher unless she offers equal or better guidance.

But it all really boils down to the students motives for taking lessons.. If my teacher understand my motives, she should know how to motivate me, if she chooses to.. sometimes she allow space for me to find my own motivation, which is also fine..

MeLisa
PS:
- to me quality lessons is of utmost importance, I learned that the hard way.. the lost of tuition fees is nothing compared to lost of precious time ..

- if the parent does not appreciate your quality lessons, the lost is theirs not yours

- For me personally, this is what its all about : Why we do all this\"

[ December 13, 2001: Message edited by: MeLisa ]

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#14338 - 12/13/01 07:48 PM Re: Motivation through Money
Jalapeņo Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/04/00
Posts: 5712
Thanks for your comments, MeLisa. I've always wondered if parents know or realize what they're getting (or supposed to get) for the money they're paying or not. While I enjoyed taking piano lessons & never would have considered going to any teacher other than the one I was taking lessons from, I can tell you that I didn't fully know whether I was going to a top-notch teacher or not, & certainly didn't appreciate her as much as I should have, until I got into my teens & started performing frequently in public. As I met other people who took piano lessons for years & compared their knowledge & performance skills to mine, I became increasingly aware of how well she trained me. I don't think I am or ever was a musical prodigy. I remember getting discouraged when my sister could learn & progress very fast & play quite well, while I struggled & struggled. But in the end, with my teacher's patience & good instruction, I learned to play the piano. My sister, on the other hand, took lessons from a different teacher--one that allowed her to rely too much on her ear & progress through the levels too fast (in 2 years, from beginning level to Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata & similar classical repertoire). Now my sister can barely read music & learn on her own (unless she hears a song first); she doesn't even own a piano anymore. And you all know what I'm doing these days. I give my teacher a lot of credit. Guess what? My teacher was an NCTM, but was charging us less than any other teacher we knew. But unlike some people, my parents & I appreciated what she was doing for me (maybe because we didn't have that much money & things didn't come easily for us like they do for more affluent families). This is just pure conjecture, of course, but I wonder how many people really appreciate things as much as they should. Easy come, easy go. It seems to be the way most people think.

I've edited this post to correct a dee doubly dumb mistake. \:o I really shouldn't be posting at this time of night, 'cuz I'm not a night owl. I'm just waiting for a load of laundry to dry so I can fold the clothes & go to bed. Now you folks can see why I don't teach piano at night. Yikes!

[ December 13, 2001: Message edited by: Jalapeņo ]

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#14339 - 12/13/01 08:09 PM Re: Motivation through Money
Eric Offline
Star Member

Registered: 04/04/00
Posts: 2325
Loc: New York, NY
 Quote:
Originally posted by Jalapeņo:
...from beginning level to Mozart's Moonlight Sonata...


Is that one as good as Beethoven's?

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#14340 - 12/13/01 08:28 PM Re: Motivation through Money
Vivace' Offline
Star Member

Registered: 05/25/01
Posts: 1717
Loc: USA
_________________________
Then let us all do what is right, strive with all our might toward the unattainable, develop as fully as we can the gifts God has given us,and never stop learning." ~ Ludwig van Beethoven

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#14341 - 12/13/01 08:50 PM Re: Motivation through Money
Jalapeņo Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/04/00
Posts: 5712
 Quote:
Originally posted by Eric:
Is that one as good as Beethoven's?


ROFLMREO! I can't believe I did that! \:o I must be sleepier than I thought (but I'm not too sleepy to laugh at myself). I attended Piano Kid's Honor Choir Christmas Performance tonight [which was great, btw :)] but they made us sit through a PTA meeting & a violin ensemble [they played 3 normally peppy Christmas tunes--Jolly Old St. Nicholas, Jingle Bells & one other that I'm too tired right now to recall--all at the same adagio tempo that put everyone to sleep. As I sat there with the little one in my lap, waiting for what seemed like an eternity for them to get around to letting the choir perform, I could only sit there & mentally rewrite the lyrics ("Sleepy Old St. Nicholas," "Dragging Through the Snow," etc.) :rolleyes: Yawn...

BTW, they performed a musical called "The 12 Entire Days of Christmas." Has anyone heard it? It was really cute, especially the rap song about faxing a letter to Santa. They presented a variety of musical styles, which was nice 'cuz it kept us all alert (especially after the PTA meeting & the violins). \:\)

[ December 13, 2001: Message edited by: Jalapeņo ]

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