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#14288 - 07/11/01 08:36 PM Re: from work to play
Janice Offline
Mainstay Member

Registered: 01/19/01
Posts: 565
Loc: Newalla, Oklahoma, USA
Lisa, I would love it! I am usually in the house by 8:00pm and I stay up late.
Chelsea is doing better and will be fine except for her bad mood. Today I was told she had to move in the house until her eye heals. What rabbit do you know has their own bedroom? She's in a cage and still remembers the litter training from when she was a baby but now I wonder if she will be able to go back outside until the heat is over. I'm not ready for this. At least she is quiet. Believe it or not, rabbits have a voice and she is using it. The vet smiled and said I think she's saying I love you. (I don't think so) She just grumbles. I miss the sweet bunny she was.

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#14289 - 07/11/01 09:06 PM Re: from work to play
Rhapsody Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/19/00
Posts: 2329
Janice,

Aside from Chelsea's annoyance with the heat, her eye problem and being given eye drops 5 times a day, plus seeing the Vet more than once within a few days time, do you think part of her grumpiness could be because she misses her bunny friends you gave away? I don't know how friendly she was with them, but even though I was not that fond of many of my relatives and dreaded their visits when I was a child, after they were gone I somehow felt a bit lonely. This passed quickly for me, but maybe Chelsea actually liked your other bunnies. Just a thought... \:D
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#14290 - 07/12/01 06:44 AM Re: from work to play
Jalapeņo Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/04/00
Posts: 5712
Maybe she needs a male rabbit friend (though you'd soon be stuck with more bunnies!) ;\)

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#14291 - 07/12/01 08:07 AM Re: from work to play
Janice Offline
Mainstay Member

Registered: 01/19/01
Posts: 565
Loc: Newalla, Oklahoma, USA
Rhapsody, thanks for the concern about Chelsea. She never knew the other bunnies (in a little more uppity class, you know ;\) ) She lived a total different part of the yard. She never once rubbed noses with them. As far as a male friend--this is my little girl you're talking about! hee hee Actually it's tooo hot to have baby bunnies and right now in her mood she might do in a guy rabbit. In the rabbit world, if a female doesn't like the male at mating time, she can kill him. The female is the one who calls the shots. (This was info from two rabbit experts) It happens in the rodent world. (experienced it in the gerbal world - long story)
I am sure her eye just hurts and she doesn't understand pain. I have told her if she doesn't get in a better mood after she is well, start packing!



[ July 12, 2001: Message edited by: Janice ]

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#14292 - 07/12/01 10:10 AM Re: from work to play
Jalapeņo Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/04/00
Posts: 5712
Too bad females don't call the shots in the human world! ;\)

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#14293 - 07/12/01 10:17 AM Re: from work to play
Jason Offline
Star Member

Registered: 05/14/00
Posts: 2019
Loc: Iowa City, IA
It's always struck me that music's a pretty odd field when it comes to gender/race.

The concert pianists and teachers tend to be male, the teachers tend to be women, the students (at least at the college level) tend to be asian, and the Russians tend to win all the competitions.
_________________________
"If we continually try to force a child to do what he is afraid to do, he will become more timid, and will use his brains and energy, not to explore the unknown, but to find ways to avoid the pressures we put on him." (John Holt)


www.pianoped.com

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#14294 - 07/12/01 10:52 AM Re: from work to play
Lilla C Offline
Contributing Member

Registered: 06/06/01
Posts: 48
Loc: Chicago
I've been running a little test in my small studio - my contest winners (attendance, perfect performance, assignments complete, etc., etc.) are always the Asians. Likewise at our local high school almost the entire top 10% is Asian. One of my Asian students is just going into high school. This student is taking her second junior college math course on the side, for no credit. Also taking multiple instrument lessons. All with no prodding from parents - entirely self-motivated. I don't know what it is, but it is unmistakably there. I will admit though that this particular transfer student came to me reading and counting beautifully, but mechanically. I have worked hard and successfully getting her to bring out feeling in her music. When I demonstrate the difference, she can pick it up in a week or so. If I don't demonstrate, she reverts to mechanical. As opposed to my worst-reading student who never wins a contest, but who plays beautifully by ear and composes lovely pieces. Hmmmm. Something to think about. Lilla

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#14295 - 07/12/01 11:58 AM Re: from work to play
Jalapeņo Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/04/00
Posts: 5712
There was an article in Clavier regarding an interview with a piano teacher (can't remember her name right off the top of my head, sorry!) who has taught successfully in Japan. In her comparisons of Japanese & American students, she said that Japanese students are way ahead technically, but that American students are far more creative. I imagine that it has a lot to do with what society expects. Let's face it. Doing a top-notch job, striving for perfection, or whatever you want to call it, is not an ideal that most Americans try to reach. And I'd venture to say (I could be wrong, so please don't throw cyberbricks, okay?) that most Japanese people don't value creativity & individualism as much as Americans do. I always wonder why few people manage to find a good balance; i.e., excellence in performance coupled with creative expression.

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#14296 - 07/12/01 12:18 PM Re: from work to play
Rhapsody Offline
Star Member

Registered: 11/19/00
Posts: 2329
 Quote:
Originally posted by Jalapeno:
And I'd venture to say (I could be wrong, so please don't throw cyberbricks, okay?) that most Japanese people don't value creativity & individualism as much as Americans do.


A perfect example of this is reflected in Japanese and Chinese art. Quite often the artist's name is unimportant and unknown and repetition of subject matter and form is desired. A beautiful recreation is often valued as highly or more highly than something totally new. The refinement rather rather than the creativity is most important.
I agree with Jalapeno that a balance -- the best of both cultures -- would be the ideal. When this balance is attained, true beauty and artisty is the result.
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There is no cure for boring.

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#14297 - 07/12/01 12:30 PM Re: from work to play
Jason Offline
Star Member

Registered: 05/14/00
Posts: 2019
Loc: Iowa City, IA
I've heard this argument often before, but I just don't see a lack of creativity in Japanese culture. After all, their culture has come up with Anime, and having seen Akira, Dragonball Z, and some other examples, I find them wildly imaginative. Take also for example the games available for the PS2 in Japan, as well as all the little electronic gadgets they play with. Having 3 Asian and 5 Caucasian students of my own of similar age, I can't tell a difference in imagination at all. However, all 3 of my Asians prepare well for lessons, while only 3 of my Caucasians do.

Of course, for any pianist, you have to have both a solid work ethic (which tends to breed technical excellence) and imagination. People with great technique and no imagination tend to get weeded out in the college years - often switching majors going to grad school, or landing completely unrelated jobs. People with great imagination and bad technique get weeded out much earlier, simply because it's hard to detect imagination in someone's playing when they can't even hit the right notes at the right time. I also think that bad imagination/good technique players tend to stick with lessons longer than bad technique/good imagination players.

Of course a lot of the problem lies in parenting styles, and I'm not prepared to say that one is better than the other. Part of the problem, however, lies in some of the teaching. Too many teachers choose one over the other. They don't know how to develop both.

Most of these teachers don't realize it, though. Some teachers think that simply assigning pages out of a "technique" book will help their student's technique. They think being in book 4 of some technique series means a student has good technique. Not true. Others think that having their students compose their own piece, invent stories, and draw pictures will help foster creativity. Wrong again. Technical development is a constant process of learning how to move. It requires that a teacher KNOW what good technique is. Unfortunately, far too many teachers don't even have a strong enough technique to handle Chopin etudes or Beethoven sonatas other than Op. 49 and 14. I'm of the opinion that even teachers of elementary students should have high technical facility.

It goes the other way, too. Imaginative playing means so many different things - quality of sound, degree and manner of phrasing, intensity of articulation, command over tempo. Yet too many teachers teachin phrasing in one way, decide on articulation and tempo based on the markings in the score alone, and don't really work on tone quality with their students.

A case in point: voicing. Why don't teachers teach voicing? I have had SO many transfer and camp students over the years who were very capable of voicing chords in their pieces, yet I can't recall any of them ever knowing what voicing was or having worked on it with their teacher. Yet voicing is one of the most important elements of having a good sound. Probably THE most important. And it's not even hard to teach, I have a grand total of about 5 things I do with students to work on voicing, and it works with students at just about any level.

Hmm...this rant is getting rather long. \:\) Sorry about that, I'll shut up now. \:D

J
_________________________
"If we continually try to force a child to do what he is afraid to do, he will become more timid, and will use his brains and energy, not to explore the unknown, but to find ways to avoid the pressures we put on him." (John Holt)


www.pianoped.com

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