Playing for our students

Posted by: Carole

Playing for our students - 11/06/03 10:03 AM

The other day I had a cancellation and was at the piano practicing some things when my next student arrived. He went wow! I like your playing. It ocurred to me that I never play for my students except to show them a passage, etc. that they may have trouble with. Even at recitals I don't because I don't want to take anything away from the students. I am thinking it would be good for me to play now and then-especially at holiday times. Not to show off any expertise but to hopefully give them incentive. Thoughts? Do you play much for your students?
Posted by: Lilla

Re: Playing for our students - 11/06/03 10:35 AM

If it's time for a student's lesson, and I'm not busy with another student, I try to always be at the piano playing when they walk in. Even if it's a just a review of their lesson materials.
Posted by: Ann

Re: Playing for our students - 11/06/03 11:03 AM

I try to be playing too when my students arrive. I don't play at formal recitals - I agree that is the Students' day.

I'm trying something new this weekend - a "Night of Musical Gems" - sort of an Open Performance night. My students, 2 of my pianist friends, a guitarist, and I will each perform our favorite pieces.

My students always ask me to play at Recitals & I feel bad declining all the time. But this will be less formal & if it works out well I'll do it every year in addition to formal Recitals.

My students also like it when I "practice perform" for them if we have time after a lesson; once in a while I will just do part of a piece to check my memory or whatever.

When my teacher performs anything at all for me, I LOVE it. It's inspiring.
Posted by: Susan

Re: Playing for our students - 11/06/03 11:12 AM

My husband's piano teacher always used to perform at his recitals. He says the parents and students loved it and looked forward to it each year. Why not try it and see how it goes unless you have a lot of students and your recital is already longer than 40 min. I would pick a piece that is not too long and is an old standard in piano literature. That way, you could talk a little about it at the lesson and the students will learn a little music history!
Posted by: Piano lady

Re: Playing for our students - 11/07/03 12:20 AM

I've learned to avoid being near the piano when a student comes in. I found out I'm a bit intimidating when I play.
Posted by: Lilla

Re: Playing for our students - 11/07/03 10:01 AM

You can solve that problem easily ;\) . Just pull out the Level 1 (or higher but not too higher) performance pieces and sheet music. That should keep you under control while keeping the materials fresh in your mind. Or how about the new releases materials? \:D

 Quote:
Originally posted by Piano lady:
I've learned to avoid being near the piano when a student comes in. I found out I'm a bit intimidating when I play.
Posted by: rainy

Re: Playing for our students - 11/09/03 06:24 PM

I just had a recital last week. I love to play for family and friends and to do weddings, but I don't enjoy playing at the recitals. Being the teacher, I feel like any mistake is a neon sign that beams, "What is she doing teaching your children?" Anyway, after all the students had performed, (and beautifully, I might add) I told the audience that I had just read a quote by Eleanor Roosevelt that said one should never ask of another what they aren't willing to do themselves. I said I would like to do a solo for them and proceeded to play. Amazingly, it went great and now I'm glad I did it. My two cents says, Go for it.
Posted by: rainy

Re: Playing for our students - 11/09/03 06:26 PM

I just had a recital last week. I love to play for family and friends and to do weddings, but I don't enjoy playing at the recitals. Being the teacher, I feel like any mistake is a neon sign that beams, "What is she doing teaching your children?" Anyway, after all the students had performed, (and beautifully, I might add) I told the audience that I had just read a quote by Eleanor Roosevelt that said one should never ask of another what they aren't willing to do themselves. I said I would like to do a solo for them and proceeded to play. Amazingly, it went great and now I'm glad I did it. My two cents says, Go for it.
Posted by: unreal

Re: Playing for our students - 11/10/03 08:03 PM

I play at my student recitals all the time. My older students ask what I'll be playing next, and the younger ones seem to love it. "Your song was long," they'll say in amazement! One little girl heard me play the first movement of Beethoven's Appassionata and told me afterwards how much she loved the "scary" part!!! You know, where it gets really quiet then comes back in with a bang. Later, she was there when I played it again, and she got up out of her seat and sat on the floor right next to the piano bench just waiting for her favorite part. She squealed and jumped with excitement when it arrived. I tell you, there's nothing like playing for an appreciative audience! \:D I think most people don't hear much classical music, and they need every opportunity they can get to hear live performances. Sometimes I play something an advanced student played last year, or will play later this year or next. Once I sprained my right wrist and so I played Scriabin's Prelude for the Left Hand, using the music. People thought it was cool! No one seems to mind much if I make a mistake. One mom said to me after such an incident that her daughter was relieved to find she was not the only person to make a mistake. I try not to make a mistake, obviously, and I usually pick shorter, easier pieces than the Appassionata. Playing at the recitals keeps me practicing, and gives me and my students a sense of camaraderie with each other. Mostly I do it because, in spite of stage fright, I really do love to play the piano.
Posted by: NancyK

Re: Playing for our students - 11/10/03 08:37 PM

unreal....I very much relate to you on this. And what a neat story about that little girl being so excited about the music!
I play at most every recital, and any other opportunity I can get. One reason is I don't ask my students to do anything I am unwilling to do. I also get some stage fright but I do it anyway. I often am playing when a student arrives and they and their parents are always happy to hear "real music" they call it. It may not even be a difficult piece but they like to hear it and see the example of me playing / practicing. At recitals my students and parents have come to expect that I will play and they look forward to it. BUT BELIEVE ME I have made some mistakes. I don't tackle real difficult pieces for such things however because I want to be comfortable. I just don't make a big deal out of it at all. I also have a duet partner that I regulary practice with and we are always preparing pieces for our next opportunity and we use our recitals as an opportunity. We have a BLAST and the audience always loves a duet. I do enjoy playing but do fight fear and the pressure of parents hearing me but I WANT to play and I want to be an example for my students AND it gives me many stories to share of overcoming difficulties in performance! If I don't play I think my students would feel I "copped out". Anyway...I think it is great for teachers to play.
Posted by: Piano lady

Re: Playing for our students - 11/11/03 12:59 AM

But then why not play for students. We're all drawing from the same place. It's about creating music. Make a mistake? Heaven forbid! It's not like those CDs people have listened to haven't been edited to **** . We cannot play a piece perfectly. No human can. Only God can.

I think classical music has gotten way too stuffy. It's way too formal. The music has been taken away from the mainstream. Opera used to be for the masses and used to poke fun at nobility. Now opera is for the rich.

I like to talk to the audience about a piece I'm going to play, even though they have a program. No one reads anyway. It also gives me a chance to relax a bit and get used to being in front of the audience. Oh yeah, we teach our students not to do that.

We went to a jazz recital on Sunday at the Triple Door in Seattle. Great performance. We got to have dinner too. The atmosphere was relaxed and people were quiet during the performance. Jazz is art, too. I was thinking that I wouldn't mind that being a setting for a piano solo or chamber recital. A symphony concert would be too loud for a dinner program.

I'll tell you there is nothing like getting ready to go to a concert during the week. Get ready in 1 hour at 5 pm, rush out the door at 6 and grab a deep fry and puke at the local fast food joint, drive an hour to the concert hall, try and find a parking place, and barely make it on time, or get stuck in traffic and miss the first part. I had season tickets last year, but this routine is way too stressful. No tickets this year.
Posted by: NancyK

Re: Playing for our students - 11/11/03 08:27 PM

Interesting what you said about classical music having become too stuffy. Another piano teacher friend and I were discussing such things the other day. Sometimes it is SO formal you can't relax and enjoy it so much or we have to worry about every little thing. I happen to play in a classic rock band with my husband and 3 friends and we have a blast with this music playing for weddings and parties and at restaurants. We play dinner sets and dance music. It is very different and very relaxed. My friend plays in an ensemble at her church and also has attended jazz concerts. These things are quite different than classical concerts. I have to say I love it all. I can't do only one. It's pretty fun to "jam" on the keyboard or bass guitar and/or sing favorite rock songs!! There are many people who enjoy this as well as classical music. I know there are others who only like classical or only rock or only jazz but I know many who crossover. I was thinking about it the other day and I have to say I just enjoy it all. My greatest love is playing a beautiful piano piece and I love to hear beautiful piano, but man do we have fun in the band. My students and their parents sometimes come hear the band and so far being involved in music other than classical has not been a detriment to my teaching career. In fact, one students family just called last night to ask the band to play at their annual Christmas party again this year. We played for my student's graduation party last year too. Her dad is an anesthesiologist and it's the hospital Christmas party we play for. Anyway
all this to say that sometimes classical does get stuffy and so formal. YET....I really enjoy it too.

[ 11-11-2003: Message edited by: NancyK ]
Posted by: Monika

Re: Playing for our students - 11/11/03 09:57 PM

At recitals, I always end up playing. I teach both flute and piano, so I'm automatically the pianist for my flutists (and it seems I always end up playing SOMETHING by Faure!). Have you ever thought about how many parents don't even know how well you play, or if you play at all? They've just taken your word for it! \:D If I play a solo, it's always at the very end.

During lessons, I do play and demonstrate. I've found that it really helps students get excited about a new piece... or, I might play for them if I want them to listen FOR something.

Speaking of listening... I haven't started this with my piano students yet, but I've always had my flute students keep a listening journal. As my own teacher would say, "how can we expect our students know how to play musically if they have never heard examples of quality music?" This applies to listening to recording AND to us, as teachers, demonstrating.
Posted by: miss beth

Re: Playing for our students - 11/12/03 10:48 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by NancyK:
Interesting what you said about classical music having become too stuffy.
[ 11-11-2003: Message edited by: NancyK ]


I have played for several formal weddings and receptions, but the one i enjoyed the most was outside by a beautiful river. It was very casual -- the guests stood -- no chairs. I played a keyboard. Absolutely LOVED it! I'll go with casual anytime!
Posted by: Jalapeņa

Re: Playing for our students - 11/12/03 12:35 PM

Classical music should be taught, & it should be played for recitals & weddings, at nursing homes, etc. How else are you going to present this beautiful music to the masses?

As I've posted before, I didn't grow up in a family that appreciated classical music, & I wasn't exposed to it except through the music my piano teacher assigned to me to play. Were it not for her, I would not have developed a love for classical music.

Yes, many people think classical music is stuffy, but I don't. I do believe that part of a piano teacher's job is to nurture & mold students' tastes in music, much as an English teacher would try to get students to read classic literature & an Art teacher would try to get students interested in fine art.

I don't think dressing up once in a while is stuffy, either... but this is where I guess I differ with a lot of folks. ;\) The only time you'll see me in completely casual clothing is when I'm doing my walk aerobics workouts or doing major housecleaning. The clothing I normally were is dressy casual. Some people might think my wardrobe is stuffy. I like to think it's classic. \:D For many people, wearing anything other than jeans & t-shirts is unthinkable (& these people probably pay as much or more for their jeans as I do for a nice pair of dress pants. Casual attire is not necessarily less expensive than dress clothing; depends on where & how you shop).
Posted by: WenBee

Re: Playing for our students - 11/12/03 12:58 PM

Jalepena, I totlly agree with you. Classical music should be accessible and appreciated in a variety of settings, not just formal. I also like a variety of styles, not exclusively classical. I also do not understand why some people only want to wear jeans, sweatshirts, and T-shirts. Life is much more interesting with more colors and styles, and I feel better being dressed better.

\:\)
Posted by: WenBee

Re: Playing for our students - 11/12/03 01:01 PM

I also agree that we should play for our students. I have performed at all my student's piano recitals. I also play their songs for them sometimes at their lessons,or demonstate a section or measure here or there. I also play the teacher duets at the end of lessons if time (rarely), but I try to get to it occasionally with each student.
Posted by: Jalapeņa

Re: Playing for our students - 11/12/03 03:27 PM

It's nice to perform familiar music arranged in classical settings. If you have a lot of Christian students, for example, you can perform classically styled hymns or Christmas carols. The best arrangements are those that have classical music (in its original form; not simplified) woven into the songs.

[ 11-12-2003: Message edited by: Jalapeņa ]
Posted by: Arlene Steffen

Re: Playing for our students - 11/12/03 07:11 PM

Really? I actually despise those. To me, it makes it seem like the classical music isn't good enough to stand on it's own or that it's not "spiritual" enough.
Posted by: Carole

Re: Playing for our students - 11/12/03 09:22 PM

Arlene, Marilynn Ham has a new sacred/classical book (Alfred)out that is wonderful. My favorite is a combination of Meditation on Thais (sp?) and My Jesus I Love Thee. It is so moving. I bet you would like it. No classical music is ever done in my church unless I do a combination like this. It is always well received. If I do straight classical, very few comments.
Posted by: NancyK

Re: Playing for our students - 11/12/03 10:40 PM

I think there is room for all of it. I have played straight classical music in church many times. I have played other things as well. I think we do need to expose people to more classical music for sure. At Christmas time, when playing Christmas music out places, I almost always also play some classical music off and on inbetween. I add in some of my own piece as well. Classical music is beautiful and it's great to dress up and go to concerts etc. It's also great to play and enjoy other types of music in a more casual setting. I think the stuffy part comes in with peoples attitudes. NOT from the musicor setting.
Posted by: Piano lady

Re: Playing for our students - 11/13/03 01:30 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Jalapeņa:
Classical music should be taught, & it should be played for recitals & weddings, at nursing homes, etc. How else are you going to present this beautiful music to the masses?

As I've posted before, I didn't grow up in a family that appreciated classical music, & I wasn't exposed to it except through the music my piano teacher assigned to me to play. Were it not for her, I would not have developed a love for classical music.

Yes, many people think classical music is stuffy, but I don't. I do believe that part of a piano teacher's job is to nurture & mold students' tastes in music, much as an English teacher would try to get students to read classic literature & an Art teacher would try to get students interested in fine art.

I don't think dressing up once in a while is stuffy, either... but this is where I guess I differ with a lot of folks. ;\)


I said it has become stuffy. I didn't say the music IS stuffy. To tell you the truth, I saw some far better dressed people (as in to the nines) at the jazz recital than I see at classical performances. I'm usually way over dressed for classical concerts (as in top artist concerts and symphony concerts).

The whole thing is about the music for the sake of the music. We're all drawing from the same space. Some people get too much ego involved and the music starts screaming "Me! Me! Me!" and I leave. This is across the entire spectrum.

We play for the sake of expressing our art and sharing that expression with others. A small group is starting a noon time concert series at our community college. Bring your sandwich and hear solo piano, chamber, jazz, whatever people decide to play. That's a step in the right direction.
Posted by: Vivace'

Re: Playing for our students - 11/13/03 06:04 AM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Arlene Steffen:
Really? I actually despise those. To me, it makes it seem like the classical music isn't good enough to stand on it's own or that it's not "spiritual" enough.


DITTO!!!!!!!
Posted by: Jalapeņa

Re: Playing for our students - 11/13/03 07:05 AM

I love the classical-infused hymns & carols because, quite frankly, the traditional hymn "arrangements" (I use that term very loosely) :rolleyes: found in the Protestant church hymnals are chordal (SATB; no piano accompaniment whatsoever) & flat out boring to play & to listen to. They're useful for congregational singing, but that's about it. As Chef Emeril would say, the music needs to be "taken up a notch." (actually, more than one notch, if you ask me) ;\) \:D

Lillenas publishes several books of well-composed church hymns & Christmas carols. I really like them. \:\) These are, IMO, the best arrangements to play for Christians who love hymns & Christmas carols & would not otherwise care to hear classical music. Even my 85-year-old mother, who says she doesn't like classical music, loves it when I play these arrangements.

As a performer, you must consider your audience & carefully select music that will appeal to them. If you can find a way to include classical music, please do so. It's the only way you're going to get some people to listen to it.

Pianolady: Maybe classical music has become stuffy because the performers refuse to include other styles of music in their performances. Also, like you said, they need to get over themselves. I doubt that will ever happen, though.

[ 11-13-2003: Message edited by: Jalapeņa ]
Posted by: Lisa Kalmar

Re: Playing for our students - 11/13/03 07:42 AM

I hate that combo stuff too. Makes me feel like I'm stuck in a elevator at the mall with an entire chapter of the Christian Women's Temperance League.

If you're playing classical music and not getting compliments on it and that's what you truly desire, then switch to a more mellow type of classical music like what's in Alfred's Melodious Masterpiece series. I, of course, experiencing a declining Estrogen Factor, would recommend that you just Not Care and play classical music to your heart's content to expose it to the recalcitrant masses. And if some hussy on the Music Committee is brazen enough to say something I would give them my best cheerleader grin and say, "Why, bless your heart! You can just BITE ME!!!"

oops, I digressed a little... \:o

Also, I threw out my copies of Dress for Success years ago. My standard uniform consists of jeans & sweaters. Natural fiber, of course, but so what. :rolleyes: ;\)

Lisa, feeling a little churlish this a.m.
Posted by: Jalapeņa

Re: Playing for our students - 11/13/03 07:55 AM

I played classically arranged hymns & Christmas carols for offertories at church for many years because it was a way for me to play the music the congregation liked & wanted to hear in the musical style that I loved. I was the only one in my church that ever played classical music, in any form, for church services. Some members of the congregation really appreciated it when I performed these arrangements, & so I felt I was doing my part to keep classical music alive. I think that's the reason these arrangements were created, & I believe there's a place for them to be used.

Of course, I also performed Contemporary Christian music. Whenever I got up to sing or play, people never quite knew what to expect out of me. \:D A few old fogies got bent out of shape because I occasionally performed music that they didn't think should be played at church (not the "right" chords or rhythms, I guess), :rolleyes: but that's a topic for a different thread.

Again, consider your audience. If Lisa, Viv & Arlene come to my house & want to hear me play, I promise I won't perform one of my Lillenas arrangements. \:D I'll stick to pure, "unadulterated" classical pieces for you folks, okay? ;\) \:D
Posted by: Arlene Steffen

Re: Playing for our students - 11/13/03 03:52 PM

I play both classical music and hymn arrangements at my church. I just don't like hymn arrangements that have classical music woven into them.

I found two books really great hymn arrangements: Praise in Classical Style by James Clemens (Flammer Music)-Jim Clemens is a college classmate of mine and I was pleasantly surprised to find this a few years ago- and The Emergency Piano Book (sorry I don't have the publisher on that - it's in the van and my husband just left to take Joe to soccer).

What I like about these two books is that they are musically interesting and they aren't the same old hymns that are in every other book of arrangements. I get tired of "The Old Rugged Cross" and "Great is Thy Faithfulness" after the umpteenth time!
Posted by: Jalapeņa

Re: Playing for our students - 11/13/03 04:18 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by Arlene Steffen:
I get tired of "The Old Rugged Cross" and "Great is Thy Faithfulness" after the umpteenth time!


Me too! Seems like most piano books contain the same hymns over & over again, even though the hymnal contains hundreds of hymns. Of course, I know a few song directors who have the congregation sing the same hymns & praise/worship choruses week after week rather than trying to teach the congregation to sing something different. :rolleyes: They get stuck in a rut, I suppose. Sure is irksome when you consider how many nice hymns there are!

Where do you order the books you mentioned above, Arlene? I'd like to know. Thanks. \:\)
Posted by: Arlene Steffen

Re: Playing for our students - 11/13/03 08:26 PM

I found them at my local music store.
Posted by: Lilla

Re: Playing for our students - 11/14/03 07:51 AM

Mmmm. Well, speaking as a member of the congregation I used to hate it when they played a different arrangement of my favorite hymns. I loved to sing the well-known favorites. Every once in awhile they'd have a congregation sing-along to introduce new hymns. Ick.

Now, as a teacher, I am in need of Catholic hymns that are recommended for instruction. They can't have that "sacred" or "praise band" sound to them. I know of Catholic websites for purchasing materials, but I'm looking for recommendations.
Posted by: Susan

Re: Playing for our students - 11/14/03 11:00 AM

This thread has been around the world and back. Interesting stuff.
As to Catholic hymns, I have been under the impression that there is no Catholic hymnal for congregational singing. The words of the hymns are printed in the service leaflet. Is this true? I have many Catholic students, and they have to play out of a hymnal for one of our festivals. I usually use an Episcopalian hymnal and ask them to pick out one they like. I would love a list of well known Catholic hymns.
FJH has an Early Elementary book of Catholic hymns that my beginning Catholic students love. --Susan
Posted by: Lisa Kalmar

Re: Playing for our students - 11/14/03 11:24 AM

If by Catholic you are referring to Roman Catholics, there are indeed hymnals. Not that they are universally used or anything, ironic since they call themselves the Universal church, and if they did no one would sing anyway because of the way they have those cantors Robert Gouleting away up there. (IMO miking a cantor or song leader is the same as giving a congregation permission to sit there and not sing! :rolleyes: ) PLUS those Daggone missalettes (which is the bulletin-like thing you were referring to) that were an offshoot of Vatican II ruined everything. For a fascinating and hilarious education on the situation I highly recommend reading Why Catholics Don't(Can't? - not sure which word it is) Sing. The part about Here I Am Lord is Depends-inducing It's a hoot and would probably bring joy to a proper 'Piscopalian's heart. \:D

But I digress: The source for Roman Catholic schtuff is GIA publications. All of the RC hymnals I've ever used had the standard high protestant stuff in 'em - nothing like The Old Rugged Cross or Nazareney/Baptistey stuff like that, though, cuz the theology is way off.) I always think of the plainsong hymns as a good starting point. O Come, O Come, Emmanuel comes to mind (VENI EMMANUEL). ALso, STABAT MATER, stuff like that.

That said, the average RC walking down the street wouldn't recognize too many of 'em. I'm partial to the Jesuit stuff that came out in the late 60's/70's \:o but a lot of 'em have never been exposed to it either - depends on the music quality of the individual parish which is more than likely underbudgetted and staffed as a rule.
Posted by: Lilla

Re: Playing for our students - 11/14/03 11:51 AM

I have a feeling the RC church has changed quite a bit since some of you have been around. We sing "hymns" - along the line of "Here I Am Lord" which is one of my favorites BTW. Haven't read the book, Lisa, but I will. And the cantor doesn't lead the hymn-singing. It's an intentional Protestant steal to keep the congregation happy. And things like Sweet Hour of Prayer are in the hymnal, but rarely used. I need to be sure my students can play the required stuff (the Gloria, Lord's Prayer, the great Amen, etc.), and also play the most popular hymns - Here I Am Lord, On Eagle's Wings, Lord of the Rings (is that the right name?), etc. But I'd like to use decent materials, geared towards an elementary/intermediate student. BTW, the Faber primer book is ok, but my students don't recognize even one piece from it. Not sure where they pulled those pieces from. Guess this should have been a new thread, huh? Thanks for suggestions - they are most welcome.
Posted by: Jalapeņa

Re: Playing for our students - 11/14/03 12:00 PM

My church in FL once had a song leader who had the congregation sing "He Lives" every single Sunday. We all got sick & tired of it &, needless to say, he soon lost his position as song leader.

But hey, at least I attended a church with a congregation that sang! Lisa's comments about the Roman Catholics made me think about the Methodist church I attended in TX. The congregation in that church didn't sing, either. Well, I take that back. I sang, loud & strong, from the back row. (When you have small children, that's where you sit, ya know). ;\) Several people made comments to me about how well I sing, & about how I should be in the choir. I kept thinking to myself, "Do I have to be a choir member to be permitted to sing?" ROFLMREO! \:D

I recognize all the hymns in the Faber books.

[ 11-14-2003: Message edited by: Jalapeņa ]
Posted by: Susan

Re: Playing for our students - 11/14/03 12:26 PM

Lilla, Lisa, where can I get a R Catholic hymnal? I've checked the Catholic book store here. It's more of a gift shop.
and Lilla, you're right, the kids don't know the hymns in the FJH book, but their parents seem too, and they work on them together. Also the arrangement duets are nice. And the kids really like to play them. Plus, their parents are comfortable with the book. I do try to please.
--Susan
Posted by: Lisa Kalmar

Re: Playing for our students - 11/14/03 12:55 PM

Susan, try www.giamusic.com They also have a tollfree number and used to be fab about answering questions. The main guy/owner will know if there's anything out there like you're looking for, whether they publish it or not.

Lilla, interesting comments, since every RC service I've ever played for (multi-states even!) has had a cantor leading the non-singing. I wonder if it's different since you're in Chicagoland and that's a little bit more uptown. You probably won't like what he has to say about Here I AM cuz it's on his Top 10 Worst RC hymn list.. I can't listen to it now without hearing the Brady Bunch song! \:D Aside: Lutheran ministers love to belt that one out at their Pastard meetings. My theory is they like the part where they finally get to be God: "I the Lord...." :rolleyes: \:D It sounds like you like the same stuff I do. I especially love some of Marty Haugen's newer things and like to play the Cotter arrangements. Strangely, none of my RC neighbors in Omaha knew any of 'em and O is predominately RC! It's a Wicked Shame that they don't too. \:\(
Posted by: Lilla

Re: Playing for our students - 11/14/03 01:48 PM

Ok. Now I"m picking on Jala. I am Roman Catholic now, but was brought up Methodist. The Methodist church is reknowned for hymn singing! That's why I know How Great Thou Art, In The Garden, Sweet Hour of Prayer by heart. But then, maybe you're referring to those offshoot Methodist churches. You know, not The 1st United Methodist Church of (insert city name), but rather the Friendship Methodist Church, etc. I don't know what they do in those churches but I've heard some strange stories about rolling in the aisles, etc. LOL. Not to offend anyone. We all have our strange ways when it comes to churches. It's very personal, no?
Posted by: Jalapeņa

Re: Playing for our students - 11/14/03 04:22 PM

I attended a very large United Methodist church in TX that averaged over 1,000 people every Sunday morning (2 morning services to accommodate the # of people in attendance), yet I was practically singing the hymns solo! The choir sang, but not the congregation. Go figure. Kinda weird if you ask me. It's probably a Lubbock thang, not a Methodist thang. Lubbock's not exactly the most musical place in the world, ya know. :rolleyes:

I was raised Nazarene, but my family later switched to Assemblies of God, which had very musical Sunday services to say the least. I now consider myself non-denominational, but I tend to prefer the more subdued Nazarene style of worship. I don't mind the hand clapping or the loud singing in the A/G, but don't particularly care to join in when they dance. But that's just me; I never have been much of a dancer. I only dance when a problem student or parent terminates piano lessons, LOL! \:D

[ 11-14-2003: Message edited by: Jalapeņa ]
Posted by: alidoremi

Re: Playing for our students - 11/14/03 04:33 PM

 Quote:
I was raised Nazarene, but my family later switched to Assemblies of God, which had very musical Sunday services to say the least


I can vouch for that! Being raised as "nothing" until the age of 13, then a year-long stint as a Presbyterian, then another year-long stint in the Methodist church, the Assembly of God church was COMPLETELY different from anything I'd every experienced (musically and otherwise).

And A/G churches in Texas are again completely different than those in California.

[ 11-14-2003: Message edited by: alidoremi ]
Posted by: Jalapeņa

Re: Playing for our students - 11/14/03 04:39 PM

 Quote:
Originally posted by alidoremi:
And A/G churches in Texas are again completely different than those in California.


Yep. That's because each A/G church is independently governed. Each church believes in 7 basic tenets of faith, but that's the only thing A/G churches have in common with each other. So when you attend an A/G church, the service can range from very traditional or very eccentric, depending on how the church elders want the services to be conducted.

BTW, no one in the A/G church I belonged to ever stomped their foot or rolled in the aisles. Thought I'd set the record straight on that, lest you think of me as a "holy roller." Our church was musical, but never went to extremes. There were very few times that anyone danced, for that matter. Ninety-nine percent of the time we just sang & clapped our hands.

[ 11-14-2003: Message edited by: Jalapeņa ]
Posted by: alidoremi

Re: Playing for our students - 11/14/03 06:35 PM

There was never 'rolling in the aisles' at my church either, but Boy! they were strict about stuff when it came to the youth. For example, every summer we'd go to a church camp located somewhere around San Antonio/New Braunfels in central Texas. Girls slept in dorms (no air conditioning), guys 6 to a cabin (I mean, chicken coop). Of course, the coops were several hundred yards away from the dorms. The swimming pool was 50 ft. away from the dorms, yet we girls had to be fully-clothed when walking to the pool, which was surrounded by a 6 ft. high fence (I think the year I started going to camp was the first year they allowed guys and girls to even swim together!). Anyhow, during the day no one was allowed to wear shorts for all the activities/sports, and jeans in July/August, when it's 98 degrees w/100% humidity is no fun. Every night we'd have an evening service and the girls had to wear dresses (which back then included high heels or other tall shoes). This was horrible when walking down the rocky terrain from our dorm to the ampitheater. Musical entertainment (for us teens) usually consisted of some Southern Gospel-like trio. When I moved to California I couldn't believe the difference. The entertainment at Youth Conventions was "Crumbacher" and "Steve Taylor"; a welcome change!

Ahh... the memories. Sorry to digress.